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I'm trying to find out how I can animate the height of stacked elements like in this example: http://jsfiddle.net/QtrDj/ without having that "vibration" on the bottom.

When you click the red bar, you see that the bottom of the bottom blue bar does not stay in place. What I would like to animate is the height of the two elements but without changing the sum of their height.

I guess the problem is that at some point during the animation the calculated value rounds to a smaller/larger value.

Can I prevent this with jQuery?

I found other questions with simultaneous animation and they all said queue but actually I'm looking for something else not just simultaneous but also with extra constraints. This is what I tried:

var one = jQuery(".one").animate({
    height: equal ? 50 : 150
}, {
    queue: false
}).promise();

var two = jQuery(".two").animate({
    height: equal ? 150 : 50
}, {
    queue: false
}).promise();

jQuery.when(one, two).done(function () {
    equal = !equal;
});

Thanks, Norbert

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

you could fake it with a solid blue div as the background. and then use a border-bottom on your top div so that they look like separate divs. This would allow for the 'vibration' without it being visually apparent

Try this JSFiddle

HTML

<div class="container">
    <div class="bar red">Click me</div>
    <div class="stack-container">
        <div class="stacked-bar blue one"></div>
        <div class="stacked-bar blue two"></div>
    </div>
</div>
<p>Click the red bar</p>

CSS

.container { width: 108px; font-size: 0; }

.bar{
    display: inline-block;
    width: 50px;
    margin: 2px;
}
.stack-container{
    display:inline-block;
    width:50px;
    float:left;
    margin:2px;
    background:black;
    height:204px;
}

.bar { height: 204px; float: left; }
.stacked-bar { 
    display: inline-block;
    width: 50px;
    height: 100px; 
}
.one{
    border-bottom:4px solid white;
}
.red { background-color: red; }
.blue { background-color: blue; }

JS

var equal = true;

jQuery(".red").on("click", function () {
    "use strict";

    var one = jQuery(".one").animate({
        height: equal ? 50 : 150
    }, {
        queue: false
    }).promise();

    var two = jQuery(".two").animate({
        height: equal ? 150 : 50
    }, {
        queue: false
    }).promise();

    jQuery.when(one, two).done(function () {
        equal = !equal;
    });

});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I accept your solution because it solves the problem, but I don't think I will use it. I'm really against any kind of hacks that involve "let's introduce another element" just for design :) – norbertk May 10 '14 at 14:29
    
@norbertk totally understand, if you're worried about adding DOM elements into your HTML, you could look at adding pseudo-elements in CSS using something like :after or :before to do the same thing? – haxxxton May 11 '14 at 23:16

I'm not sure if you can prevent it unless you want to rewrite the whole animation code yourself. I've rewritten the code using css transitions and an event listener and it does the same

jQuery(".one").on( 
     'webkitTransitionEnd', 
     function( event ) { 
         equal = !equal;
         alert( "Finished transition!" ); 
     } );

like here:

http://jsfiddle.net/pH5r2/

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