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Code:

# coding=utf-8
import pytest


def whatever():
    return 9/0

def test_whatever():
    try:
        whatever()
    except ZeroDivisionError as exc:
        pytest.fail(exc, pytrace=True)

Output:

================================ test session starts =================================
platform linux2 -- Python 2.7.3 -- py-1.4.20 -- pytest-2.5.2
plugins: django, cov
collected 1 items 

pytest_test.py F

====================================== FAILURES ======================================
___________________________________ test_whatever ____________________________________

    def test_whatever():
        try:
            whatever()
        except ZeroDivisionError as exc:
>           pytest.fail(exc, pytrace=True)
E           Failed: integer division or modulo by zero

pytest_test.py:12: Failed
============================== 1 failed in 1.16 seconds ==============================

How to make pytest print traceback, so I would see where in whatver function exception was raised?

share|improve this question
    
I get the entire traceback, Ubuntu 14.04, Python 2.7.6 –  thefourtheye Apr 28 '14 at 9:41
    
@thefourtheye Make gist with output please. I tried with Python 2.7.4 and Ubunthu 14.04 - with same result as I described in main post. –  Gill Bates Apr 28 '14 at 9:58

3 Answers 3

Do you mean smthg like this:

def test_raises():
    with pytest.raises(Exception) as excinfo:   
        raise Exception('some info')   
    assert excinfo.value == 'some info' 
share|improve this answer

pytest.raises(Exception) is what you need.

Code

import pytest

def test_passes():
    with pytest.raises(Exception) as e_info:
        x = 1 / 0

def test_passes_without_info():
    with pytest.raises(Exception):
        x = 1 / 0

def test_fails():
    with pytest.raises(Exception) as e_info:
        x = 1 / 1

def test_fails_without_info():
    with pytest.raises(Exception):
        x = 1 / 1

# Don't do this. Assertions are caught as exceptions.
def test_passes_but_should_not():
    try:
        x = 1 / 1
        assert False
    except Exception:
        assert True

# Even if the appropriate exception is caught, it is bad style,
# because the test result is less informative
# than it would be with pytest.raises(e)
# (it just says pass or fail.)

def test_passes_but_bad_style():
    try:
        x = 1 / 0
        assert False
    except ZeroDivisionError:
        assert True

def test_fails_but_bad_style():
    try:
        x = 1 / 1
        assert False
    except ZeroDivisionError:
        assert True

Output

============================================================================================= test session starts ==============================================================================================
platform linux2 -- Python 2.7.6 -- py-1.4.26 -- pytest-2.6.4
collected 7 items 

test.py ..FF..F

=================================================================================================== FAILURES ===================================================================================================
__________________________________________________________________________________________________ test_fails __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    def test_fails():
        with pytest.raises(Exception) as e_info:
>           x = 1 / 1
E           Failed: DID NOT RAISE

test.py:13: Failed
___________________________________________________________________________________________ test_fails_without_info ____________________________________________________________________________________________

    def test_fails_without_info():
        with pytest.raises(Exception):
>           x = 1 / 1
E           Failed: DID NOT RAISE

test.py:17: Failed
___________________________________________________________________________________________ test_fails_but_bad_style ___________________________________________________________________________________________

    def test_fails_but_bad_style():
        try:
            x = 1 / 1
>           assert False
E           assert False

test.py:43: AssertionError
====================================================================================== 3 failed, 4 passed in 0.02 seconds ======================================================================================
share|improve this answer

Why don't you just let the error propagate? The test will be marked as error not failed, but is that distinction really important to you? def test_whatever(): whatever()

share|improve this answer
    
If somebody, who not familiar with code, will get an error instead of a fail, he will be confused, and it will take time to him to understand that this error is actually an assertion. –  Gill Bates Apr 28 '14 at 11:17

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