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I got a homework assignment asking me to invoke a function without explicitly calling it, using buffer overflow. The code is basically this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void g()
{
    printf("now inside g()!\n");
}


void f()
{   
    printf("now inside f()!\n");
    // can only modify this section
    // cant call g(), maybe use g (pointer to function)
}

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    f();
    return 0;
}

Though I'm not sure how to proceed. I thought about changing the return address for the program counter so that it'll proceed directly to the address of g(), but I'm not sure how to access it. Anyway, tips will be great.

share|improve this question
    
Interesting question! –  Georg Schölly Feb 25 '10 at 12:35
8  
4 upvotes for a homework question! The OP didn't even come up with the question... wow, some people are easily impressed. –  Lazarus Feb 25 '10 at 12:41
    
@Lazarus, I upvoted your comment. Uh oh! :-) –  Alok Singhal Feb 25 '10 at 12:42
12  
@Lazarus the fact that it is a homework question has nothing to do with the fact that I find it interesting. I also upvoted it because I want to encourage interesting homework questions rather than the simple "I closed the file buffer and now when I try reading from the file it doesn't work. Why?" (In other words, I upvote the questions I don't know the answer to, but want to) –  Yacoby Feb 25 '10 at 12:54
1  
Whoa, that's a hw question? I'm already loving your teacher :D –  Andreas Grech Feb 25 '10 at 15:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The basic idea is to alter the function's return address so that when the function returns is continues to execute at a new hacked address. As done by Nils in one of the answers, you can declare a piece of memory (usually array) and overflow it in such a way that the return address is overwritten as well.

I would suggest you to not blindly take any of the programs given here without actually understanding how they work. This article is very well written and you'll find it very useful:

A step-by-step on the buffer overflow vulnerablity

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That is compiler dependent, so no single answer can be given.

The following code will do what you want for gcc 4.4.1. Compile with optimizations disabled (important!)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void g()
{
    printf("now inside g()!\n");
}


void f()
{   
  int i;
  void * buffer[1];
  printf("now inside f()!\n");

  // can only modify this section
  // cant call g(), maybe use g (pointer to function)

  // place the address of g all over the stack:
  for (i=0; i<10; i++)
     buffer[i] = (void*) g;

  // and goodbye..
}

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    f();
    return 0;
}

Output:

nils@doofnase:~$ gcc overflow.c
nils@doofnase:~$ ./a.out
now inside f()!
now inside g()!
now inside g()!
now inside g()!
now inside g()!
now inside g()!
now inside g()!
Segmentation fault
share|improve this answer
    
I'm using gcc 4.4.1, and not sure how to turn optimization off: tried gcc -O0 -o buff buff.c (that's oh-zero) and also gcc -O1 -fno-defer-pop -fno-thread-jumps -fno-branch-probabilities -fno-cprop-registers -fno-guess-branch-probability -fno-omit-frame-pointer -o buff buff.c neither worked. –  sa125 Feb 25 '10 at 13:00
1  
Make the application exit inside the 'g()' function to avoid Segmentation fault =) –  Kieveli Feb 25 '10 at 13:00
    
sa125, maybe gcc tries to optimize to a different cpu architecture. As far as I know it defaults to the cpu of the system you're running. That can change how the stackframe of f() looks like and may prevent the overflow from happening. –  Nils Pipenbrinck Feb 25 '10 at 13:06
    
Nils - maybe I'm a little slow this morning -- but how is it that you're getting "now inside g()" to be printed -- I see where you're storing the pointers to g(), but I don't see in your example code where you're de-referencing the pointer(s) & invoking g() –  Dan Feb 26 '10 at 14:48
1  
Dan, f() gets called from main, During the call the compiler will put the return address onto the stack, so f() knows where it has to jump to when it's done. However, inside f() I overwrite a large portion of the stack with the address of g(). Chances are that I override the return address as well. So when f() exits, it will not return to main but jump to g() instead. It's really dirty, but that's what the question was about. –  Nils Pipenbrinck Feb 26 '10 at 15:05

Since this is homework, I would like to echo codeaddict's suggestion of understanding how a buffer overflow actually works.

I learned the technique by reading the excellent (if a bit dated) article/tutorial on exploiting buffer overflow vulnerabilities Smashing The Stack For Fun And Profit.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for linking to that article. –  Andreas Grech Feb 25 '10 at 15:13

Try this one:

void f()
{   
    void *x[1];
    printf("now inside f()!\n");
    // can only modify this section
    // cant call g(), maybe use g (pointer to function)
    x[-1]=&g;
}

or this one:

void f()
{   
    void *x[1];
    printf("now inside f()!\n");
    // can only modify this section
    // cant call g(), maybe use g (pointer to function)
    x[1]=&g;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
An explanation would be great, because it is homework. –  Georg Schölly Feb 25 '10 at 12:37
1  
x is a local variable, so it located on the stack. Since x is an array of size 1, only x[0] is valid. By writing the address of g in x[-1] or x[1], there is a chance that we will overwrite the return address. It depends of the organisation of the stack which version works. –  ammoQ Feb 25 '10 at 16:09

While this solution doesn't use an overflow technique to overwrite the function's return address on the stack, it still causes g() to get called from f() on its way back to main() by only modifying f() and not calling g() directly.

Function epilogue-like inline assembly is added to f() to modify the value of the return address on the stack so that f() will return through g().

#include <stdio.h>

void g()
{
    printf("now inside g()!\n");
}

void f()
{   
    printf("now inside f()!\n");
    // can only modify this section
    // cant call g(), maybe use g (pointer to function)

    /* x86 function epilogue-like inline assembly */
    /* Causes f() to return to g() on its way back to main() */
    asm(
        "mov %%ebp,%%esp;"
        "pop %%ebp;"
        "push %0;"
        "ret"
        : /* no output registers */
        : "r" (&g)
        : "%ebp", "%esp"
       );
}

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    f();
    return 0;
}

Understanding how this code works can lead to a better understanding of how a function's stack frame is setup for a particular architecture which forms the basis of buffer overflow techniques.

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