Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a bit lost. i have a csv file like the following

USN Name   DOB   Sem   Percentage
111 abc   07/03   3      88
112 cde   18/07   4      77
123 ghi   15/11   4      80

I want to create a dictionary kind of structure (multilevel dictionary- Dictionary <string, Dictionary<string, string>>) using C++. Here i want to store the 1st line as key i.e USN, Name, DOB ... as keys of the hash and the values in that columns as values of the hash. Is it possible? Any help will be greatly appreciated .. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
6  
what should be used as the key, and what as the value? Check out unordered_map –  Dmitry Ledentsov Apr 28 '14 at 12:02
    
    
If you need multiple indices, consider boost::container::multimap. –  Deduplicator Apr 28 '14 at 12:23
1  
Please be more precise with what you mean as "a dictionary kind of structure". And the "like C#" won't help. –  PierreBdR Apr 28 '14 at 12:26
    
@DmitryLedentsov: I have edited my question for you.. –  SauShi Apr 28 '14 at 12:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Given your question, you should be using unordered_map, which is standard in C++ 11 and very common in previous implementations. If performance is not too important (or the maps really small) you can also use map. Then you can do this:

using namespace std;
unordered_map<string, unordered_map<string, string> > dict;

After, it's a question of parsing your CSV file ...

share|improve this answer

If you have a structure defined having these fields USN,Name, DOB, Sem, Percentage with datatypes as you choose appropriately, then USN (std::string) could be key and structure (Say MyStruct type) could be value. So hash_map having string as key and MyStruct as value typedef hash_map MyDictionary; should do

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.