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I've got an extension method that used to take a strongly typed Expression<Func<>> parameter however for implementation reasons I had to change it to use a weakly type version. This has had a strange affect on the expression parameter as it now seems to be wrapping the lambda expression in an explicit call to a 'Convert' method.

Previously the paramters would look like:

m => m.Data

And now it looks like the following:

m => Convert(m.Data)

I have replicated the issue with the following example code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

namespace ConsoleApplication
{
    static class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Model model = new Model()
            {
                Data = 123
            };

            Test(m => m.Data, m => m.Data);

            Console.ReadLine();                
        }

        public static void Test<TProperty>(Expression<Func<Model, TProperty>> strongTyped, Expression<Func<Model, object>> weakTyped)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Strong Typed: {0}", strongTyped);
            Console.WriteLine("Weak Typed: {0}", weakTyped);
        }
    }

    public class Model
    {
        public int Data
        {
            get;
            set;
        }
    }
}

The output of which is as follows:

Strong Typed: m => m.Data
Weak Typed: m => Convert(m.Data)

I am guessing it has something to do with auto boxing the value type into an object type. Can anyone confirm this or does anyone know what is going on? Also does anyone know where the Convert method is declared?

Calling the compile method on the weak typed expression gives the following:

weakTyped.Compile().Method
{System.Object lambda_method(System.Runtime.CompilerServices.Closure, ConsoleApplication.Model)}
    [System.Reflection.Emit.DynamicMethod.RTDynamicMethod]: {System.Object lambda_method(System.Runtime.CompilerServices.Closure, ConsoleApplication.Model)}
    base {System.Reflection.MethodBase}: {System.Object lambda_method(System.Runtime.CompilerServices.Closure, ConsoleApplication.Model)}
    MemberType: Method
    ReturnParameter: null
    ReturnType: {Name = "Object" FullName = "System.Object"}
    ReturnTypeCustomAttributes: {System.Reflection.Emit.DynamicMethod.RTDynamicMethod.EmptyCAHolder}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Convert isn't a method at all - it's a UnaryExpression and indeed is there exactly why you theorized - boxing / type coercion. It's interesting to see when expression trees are generated, things we generally know are implicit actually appear explicitly.

If you were building an expression yourself, you can get the same effect by calling Expression.Convert():

Creates a UnaryExpression that represents a type conversion operation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you - that makes sense. I didn't realise that auto boxing would be applied to the expression I assumed it would have been applied to the result when the expression was evaluated. –  Tom Maher Apr 28 '14 at 12:50
    
@TomMaher yep. Anything else I can do to answer this? –  Rex M Apr 28 '14 at 12:55
    
No that's fine just wanted to know what was going on and where the Convert 'method' came from. Thanks again. –  Tom Maher Apr 28 '14 at 13:00

Yes, it is Conversion expression which represents boxing and not only boxing. It contains user defined conversions etc.

For example, If a type defines user defined conversions that will be convered using "Conversion expression". In this case weakTyped.Body.Method will return the overloaded method something like op_Implicit...

You can prove this with following code.

public static void Test<TProperty>(Expression<Func<Model, TProperty>> strongTyped, Expression<Func<Model, object>> weakTyped)
{
    var expr = (UnaryExpression)weakTyped.Body;
    Console.WriteLine("Weak Typed method: {0}", expr.Method);
    Console.WriteLine("Strong Typed: {0}", strongTyped);
    Console.WriteLine("Weak Typed: {0}", weakTyped);
}
public static void TestFloat<TProperty>(Expression<Func<Model, TProperty>> strongTyped, Expression<Func<Model, decimal>> weakTyped)
{
    var expr = (UnaryExpression) weakTyped.Body;
    Console.WriteLine("Weak Typed method: {0}", expr.Method);
    Console.WriteLine("Strong Typed: {0}", strongTyped);
    Console.WriteLine("Weak Typed: {0}", weakTyped);
}

For decimal type this returns overloaded operator where as object weakTyped.Body.Method will be null since it is just a boxing conversion.

share|improve this answer

The conversion has to be included in the expression tree because object is not the same as the given parameter, but since it's a generic method, you could make the weak strong, by including the generic return property

public static void Test<TProperty, TReturnValue>(Expression<Func<Model, TProperty>> strongTyped, Expression<Func<Model, TReturnValue>> weakTyped)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Strong Typed: {0}", strongTyped);
    Console.WriteLine("Weak (now also strong) Typed: {0}", weakTyped);
}

You could still use the same call Test(m => m.Data, m => m.Data);, and both TProperty and TReturnValue will be resolved by the compiler

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your response - unfortunately I have to leave the expression in its weak form due to the fact that I wanted to have an array of expressions passed in as a parameter all with potentially different return types: Test<TModel>(this TModel model, params Expression<Func<TModel, object>>[] props) –  Tom Maher Apr 28 '14 at 12:56

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