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I'm having a circular dependency problem. Basically I have two classes, the first is a template class which uses some functionality from my second class. The second class inherits from my template class.

Below is a simplified structure:

// Foo.h
#pragma once
#include "Bar.h"

template <class T> class Foo
{
     public:
        void DoSomething();
};

template <class T> void Foo<T>::DoSomething()
{
     Bar::GetInstance()->LogEvent();
}


//Bar.h
#pragma once
#include "Foo.h"

class Bar : public Foo<Bar>
{
    public:
        static Bar* GetInstance();
        void LogEvent();
};


//Bar.cpp
#include "Bar.h"

Bar* Bar::GetInstance()
{
     // return instance of Bar singleton class
}

void Bar::LogEvent()
{
     // log some event in a file
}

Now the problem is when I complile the code I am getting the following errors in bar.h

Bar.h() : error C2504: 'Foo' : base class undefined
Bar.h() : error C2143: syntax error : missing ',' before '<'

From what I can tell this a definitely a dependency problem. If I remove the call to 'LogEvent' from within 'DoSomething', and remove reference "Bar.h" from Foo.h the issue goes away.

However it's not really a solution because Foo needs functionality contained with Bar, conversely bar inherits from Foo and needs to include a reference to Foo.h.

So - how can I resolve this problem? I have looked through the other posts regarding circular references but I haven't been able to solve the problem.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
You are missing ; at the end of your class definitions. – Mankarse Apr 28 '14 at 15:07
    
@Mankarse thanks for the spot. They are they in the actual code. I've edited the post. – user3581793 Apr 28 '14 at 15:09
    
On another note, does DoSomething() need to be in Foo()? If it requires Bar, why not put it in Bar? – dlf Apr 28 '14 at 15:19
2  
Maybe I missed something, but would T::GetInstance() work for your needs ? (at least the way you have it right now)? – WhozCraig Apr 28 '14 at 15:19
    
@dlf Thanks for your comments. I've managed to compile to simplified code as well. So I'm a bit stumped. DoSomething() does need to be in Foo. – user3581793 Apr 28 '14 at 15:29

Based on the code you've posted, foo.h does not need to include bar.h, and the problem will go away if it doesn't.

The important thing is that the compiler see Foo before it sees Bar, and this may not happen if #include "bar.h" is at the top of foo.h (depending on what order foo.h and bar.h are #includeed in the consuming modules).

That said, if a base class needs to assume a specific derived class and call into it by name, it seems like there is probably a design issue (would a virtual function in the base work?). But I can't make that judgment without seeing whole picture.

Based on the comments below, I think you can solve the immediate problem by adding a third file:

// LogEvent.h

void LogEvent(...);

// LogEvent.cpp
#include "bar.h"

void LogEvent(...)
{
   Bar::GetInstance()->LogEvent(...);
}

Then modify foo.h as follows:

// Foo.h
#pragma once
#include "LogEvent.h"

template <class T> class Foo
{
     public:
        void DoSomething();
};

template <class T> void Foo<T>::DoSomething()
{
   LogEvent(...);
}

Unless there are other issues too, that should at least get you compiling.

share|improve this answer
    
As you've mentioned earlier I believe the reason the code compiles is due to the way I've simplified it. In reality I have other classes that inherit from Foo - but only 1 from which Foo needs functionality. Foo is a class that wraps up a Win32 thread as the basis of a state-machine class. The reason it's a template class is because I wanted the state functions to be part of the class which meant I needed pointers to member functions. Bar is an event logging class that is a state-machine. So the reason Foo requires Bar is to enable logging of faults in the Foo class. This may not be ideal. – user3581793 Apr 28 '14 at 16:07
    
Does Foo have other references to Bar in addition to the one you've shown? Or more precisely, is LogEvent() the only Bar function it uses? – dlf Apr 28 '14 at 17:04
    
No, there are a few references but they're all to the same function, essentially LogEvent. Foo doesn't strickly need the functionality of bar in order to function, it only uses Bar to log errors in a database. Bar is a singleton which is used application wide for that purpose. – user3581793 Apr 28 '14 at 17:18
    
See edits to my answer above. – dlf Apr 28 '14 at 17:21
    
Thanks dlf. I see how that could work as an interim solution. I think I need to go through my #includes and to see why the my sample code works and my app doesn't. I thought at first it was because my sample code didn't actually instantiate a Bar class but I've since done that and it seems to work fine. Even if I remove bar.h from foo.h it works which I don't understand, given that foo calls Bar::GetInstance(). – user3581793 Apr 28 '14 at 18:34

Your problem is the definition of the function:

template <class T> void Foo<T>::DoSomething()
{
     Bar::GetInstance()->LogEvent();
}

You don't need write Bar class name here.

use:

template <class T> void Foo<T>::DoSomething()
{
     T::GetInstance()->LogEvent();
}

That way, when you write Foo<Bar> Bar will replace T.

I tested the change with the code you posted and it worked.

EDIT:

Well I found a solution using Template Specialization.

Add this to your Foo.h:

template <>
class Foo<Bar>
{
     public:
        void DoSomething()
        {
             Bar::GetInstance()->LogEvent();
        }
};

This solve all your problems. Using template specialization, if the template Foo is instantiated with the Bar type as argument, you will be instantiating the class defined above instead the original Foo.

So, you don't have to worry any more about others classes don't have the method GetInstance. And you can use this approach to expand your code and use as many specializations of Foo as you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I think in this one specific instance yes - I could replace Bar:: with T:: However I don't want to do this because I have other classes which inherit from Foo which do not implement a GetInstance() method, or indeed a LogEvent method. In which case the code would not compile for those other classes. – user3581793 Apr 28 '14 at 15:44
    
So, your problem is beyond code, your problem is in the design. – Raydel Miranda Apr 28 '14 at 15:45
    
Answer edited, I think this might solve your problem. – Raydel Miranda Apr 28 '14 at 18:10
    
Interesting option but I don't think this would work completely in my case, as I would still need non-specialised instances of the Foo class to be able to call Bar::GetInstance()->LogEvent. I think the way i'm trying to do it is possible, but something is going on regarding my #includes. – user3581793 Apr 28 '14 at 18:54

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