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In SQL Server you can insert into a table using a select statement:

INSERT INTO table(col,col2,col3)
SELECT col,col2,col3 FROM other_table WHERE sql = 'cool'

How can I update via a select as well in a similar manner? I have a temporary table that has the values, and I want to update another table using those values.

Something like this:

UPDATE Table SET col1,col2
SELECT col1,col2 FROM other_table WHERE sql = 'cool'
WHERE Table.id = other_table.id
share|improve this question
4  
The question is almost 4 years old, there was not much about regarding the question back then. Now maybe. Is the point not that we want StackOverflow to be the de facto option that people choose? –  sparkyfied Dec 19 '13 at 13:03
    
This question has answers for SQL Server and MySQL. For sqlite, see stackoverflow.com/a/21152791/1804678 –  Jess Jan 16 at 3:26

16 Answers 16

up vote 1632 down vote accepted
UPDATE
    Table
SET
    Table.col1 = other_table.col1,
    Table.col2 = other_table.col2
FROM
    Table
INNER JOIN
    other_table
ON
    Table.id = other_table.id
share|improve this answer
4  
@RodrigoGama - Why doesn't it? I'm using it with a variable table fine. –  Omar Jan 19 '12 at 15:34
64  
'Table' is once used as name of the table and than as an alias. This is confusing. Maybe "Table t" would be better.. –  Filip May 24 '12 at 17:05
201  
Turns out I already upvoted this. I keep coming back here as I can never remember the syntax. –  Ben Challenor Oct 24 '12 at 14:20
3  
If you are editing the the link between tables (SET Table.other_table_id = @NewValue) then change the ON statement to something like ON Table.id = @IdToEdit AND other_table.id = @NewValue –  Trisped Oct 24 '12 at 18:41
5  
Isn't this missing the WHERE clause in the question? I don't have a server on this system to test it but wouldn't you be able to add that to the ON like: ON Table.id = other_table.id AND other_table.sql='cool'? Or am I misinterpreting the question? –  J V May 31 '13 at 18:15

In SQL Server 2008 (or better), use MERGE

MERGE INTO YourTable T
   USING other_table S 
      ON T.id = S.id
         AND S.tsql = 'cool'
WHEN MATCHED THEN
   UPDATE 
      SET col1 = S.col1, 
          col2 = S.col2;

Alternatively:

MERGE INTO YourTable T
   USING (
          SELECT id, col1, col2 
            FROM other_table 
           WHERE tsql = 'cool'
         ) S
      ON T.id = S.id
WHEN MATCHED THEN
   UPDATE 
      SET col1 = S.col1, 
          col2 = S.col2;
share|improve this answer
6  
Had not heard about this keyword yet, but it worked like a charm for me. Thanks! –  Matt McHugh Feb 15 '12 at 22:19
43  
MERGE can also be used for "Upserting" records; that is, UPDATE if matching record exists, INSERT new record if no match found –  brichins May 15 '12 at 19:51
8  
This was around 10x quicker than the equivalent update...join statement for me. –  Paul Suart Apr 3 '13 at 2:49
3  
MERGE can also be used to DELETE. But be careful with MERGE as the TARGET table cannot be a remote table. –  Mooz Aug 8 '13 at 3:58
    
Thanks for this, hadn't seen MERGE definitely like the syntax, and that you can use aliases (which don't work in the update/set/from) much better... I've been using WITH statements for the query part. –  Tracker1 Feb 20 at 16:48

I'd modify Robin's excellent answer to the following:

UPDATE
     Table 
SET
     Table.col1 = other_table.col1,
     Table.col2 = other_table.col2 
FROM
     Table 
INNER JOIN     
     other_table 
ON     
     Table.id = other_table.id 
WHERE
     Table.col1 != other_table.col1 or 
     Table.col2 != other_table.col2 or
     (other_table.col1 is not null and table.col1 is null) or
     (other_table.col2 is not null and table.col2 is null)

Without a WHERE clause, you'll affect even rows that don't need to be affected, which could (possibly) cause index recalculation or fire triggers that really shouldn't have been fired.

share|improve this answer
1  
This assumes none of the columns are nullable though. –  Martin Smith Nov 6 '11 at 0:03
1  
You're right, I was typing the example by hand. I've added a third and fourth clause to the where statement to deal with that. –  quillbreaker Nov 11 '11 at 20:27
19  
WHERE EXISTS(SELECT T1.Col1, T1.Col2 EXCEPT SELECT T2.Col1, T2.Col2)) is more concise. –  Martin Smith May 27 '12 at 9:44
2  
shouldn't the statement also contain these two in the where clause? (other_table.col1 is null and table.col1 is not null) or (other_table.col2 is null and table.col2 is not null) –  user277498 May 15 '13 at 4:03
2  
Depends on if you want to replace nulls in the destination with nulls from the source. Frequently, I don't. But if you do, Martin's construction of the where clause is the best thing to use. –  quillbreaker May 16 '13 at 16:35

Another possibility not mentioned yet is to just chuck the SELECT statement itself into a CTE then Update the CTE.

;WITH CTE
     AS (SELECT T1.Col1,
                T2.Col1 AS _Col1,
                T1.Col2,
                T2.Col2 AS _Col2
         FROM   T1
                JOIN T2
                  ON T1.id = T2.id
         /*Where clause added to exclude rows that are the same in both tables
           Handles NULL values correctly*/
         WHERE EXISTS(SELECT T1.Col1,
                             T1.Col2
                       EXCEPT
                       SELECT T2.Col1,
                              T2.Col2))
UPDATE CTE
SET    Col1 = _Col1,
       Col2 = _Col2  

This has the benefit that it is easy to run the SELECT statement on its own first to sanity check the results but it does requires you to alias the columns as above if they are named the same in source and target tables.

This also has the same limitation as the proprietary UPDATE ... FROM syntax shown in four of the other answers. If the source table is on the many side of a one to many join then it is undeterministic which of the possible matching joined records will be used in the Update (An issue that MERGE avoids by raising an error if there is an attempt to update the same row more than once).

share|improve this answer
    
is there any meaning of the name CTE ? –  Raptor Oct 8 '12 at 12:48
10  
@ShivanRaptor - It is the acronym for Common Table Expression. Just an arbitrary alias in this case. –  Martin Smith Oct 8 '12 at 13:05
    
Wow, I really never used CTE update before. I now have to performance test it against UPDATE FROM –  OzrenTkalcecKrznaric Jun 22 '13 at 14:29
    
This also works well with multiple CTEs: ;WITH SomeCompexCTE AS (...), CTEAsAbove AS (SELECT T1.Col1,... FROM T1 JOIN SomeComplexCTE...) UPDATE CTEAsAbove SET Col1=_Col1, ... –  VeeTheSecond Aug 29 '13 at 20:09
UPDATE Table SET Col1 = i.Col1, Col2 = i.Col2 
FROM (SELECT Col1, Col2 FROM  other_table) i
WHERE i.ID = Table.ID
share|improve this answer
1  
IMO, this is the answer to the question. Not to say that the other answers are not good or correct. –  dotnetN00b May 9 at 15:41

One way

UPDATE t SET  t.col1 = o.col1, t.col2 = o.col2
FROM other_table o 
JOIN t ON t.id = o.id
WHERE o.sql = 'cool'
share|improve this answer

For the record (and others searching like I was), you can do it in MySQL like this:

UPDATE first_table, second_table
SET first_table.color = second_table.color
WHERE first_table.id = second_table.foreign_id
share|improve this answer

Using alias:

UPDATE t
   SET t.col1 = o.col1
  FROM table1 AS t
         INNER JOIN 
       table2 AS o 
         ON t.id = o.id
share|improve this answer

This may be a niche reason to perform an update (for example, mainly used in a procedure), or may be obvious to others, but it should also be stated that you can perform an update-select statement without using join (in case the tables you're updating between have no common field).

update
    Table
set
    Table.example = a.value
from
    TableExample a
where
    Table.field = *key value* -- finds the row in Table 
    AND a.field = *key value* -- finds the row in TableExample a
share|improve this answer

I add this only so you can see a quick way to write it so that you can check what will be updated before doing the update.

UPDATE Table 
SET  Table.col1 = other_table.col1,
     Table.col2 = other_table.col2 
--select Table.col1, other_table.col,Table.col2,other_table.col2, *   
FROM     Table 
INNER JOIN     other_table 
    ON     Table.id = other_table.id 
share|improve this answer

The sample way to do it is:

UPDATE
    table_to_update,
    table_info
SET
    table_to_update.col1 = table_info.col1,
    table_to_update.col2 = table_info.col2

WHERE
    table_to_update.ID = table_info.ID
share|improve this answer
1  
Yours is formatted better; Also, when using a subselect, yours (and Adrian's) work more reliably than the other format. Thanks for posting your answer. –  Ben West Feb 14 '13 at 22:11
4  
This is not SQl Server syntax and it will not work in SQL server –  HLGEM Apr 24 '13 at 18:32

Here is another useful syntax:

UPDATE suppliers
SET supplier_name = (SELECT customers.name
                     FROM customers
                     WHERE customers.customer_id = suppliers.supplier_id)
WHERE EXISTS (SELECT customers.name
              FROM customers
              WHERE customers.customer_id = suppliers.supplier_id);

It checks if it is null or not by using "WHERE EXIST".

share|improve this answer
    
@Peter, how neccessary edits you are doing grammatically, hehe... –  kirlisakal May 30 at 8:56

If you use MySQL instead of SQL Server, the syntax is:

UPDATE
    Table
INNER JOIN
    other_table
ON
    Table.id = other_table.id
SET
    Table.col1 = other_table.col1,
    Table.col2 = other_table.col2
share|improve this answer

And if you wanted to join the table with itself (which won't happen too often):

update t1                    -- just reference table alias here
set t1.somevalue = t2.somevalue
from table1 t1               -- these rows will be the targets
inner join table1 t2         -- these rows will be used as source
on ..................        -- the join clause is whatever suits you
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 but you should have used relevant alias names like targett1 and sourcet1 rather than (or as well as) comments. –  Mark Hurd Jun 30 at 2:05

The following example uses a derived table, a SELECT statement after the FROM clause, to return the old and new values for further updates

UPDATE x
SET x.col1 = x.newCol1, x.col2 = x.newCol2
FROM (SELECT t.col1, t2.col1 AS newCol1, t.col2 , t2.col2 AS newCol2
      FROM [table] t JOIN other_table t2 ON t.ID = t2.ID
      ) x
share|improve this answer
drop table uno
drop table dos

create table uno
(
uid int,
col1 char(1),
col2 char(2)
)
create table dos
(
did int,
col1 char(1),
col2 char(2),
[sql] char(4)
)
insert into uno(uid) values (1)
insert into uno(uid) values (2)
insert into dos values (1,'a','b',null)
insert into dos values (2,'c','d','cool')

select * from uno 
select * from dos

EITHER:

update uno set col1 = (select col1 from dos where uid = did and [sql]='cool'), 
col2 = (select col2 from dos where uid = did and [sql]='cool')

OR:

update uno set col1=d.col1,col2=d.col2 from uno 
inner join dos d on uid=did where [sql]='cool'

select * from uno 
select * from dos

If the ID column name is the same in both tables then just put the table name before the table to be updated and use an alias for the selected table ie:

update uno set col1 = (select col1 from dos d where uno.[id] = d.[id] and [sql]='cool'),
col2  = (select col2 from dos d where uno.[id] = d.[id] and [sql]='cool')
share|improve this answer

protected by Mr. Alien Apr 11 '13 at 8:51

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