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I have the following classes in C++

ParentClass
{
  virtual int MyMethod();
}

class ExistingOne : ParentClass {...}

class ExistingTwo : ParentClass {...}

Now I would like to create a class that can extend either of the Existing classes and override a couple of their methods plus call a method in the Existing class under some conditions.

In C++ this is done using the following:

template< class BaseTemplate >
class MyClass : public BaseTemplate
{
  int MyMethod()
  {
    DoSomething();
    return BaseTemplate::MyMethod();
  }
}

How is this done in Java?

So far I have

public abstract class ParentClass
{
  public abstract int MyMethod();
}

public class ExistingOne extends ParentClass {...}

public class ExistingTwo extends ParentClass {...}

public class MyClass<T extends ParentClass>
{
  public int MyMethod()
  {
    DoSomething();
    return T.MyMethod();  //MyMethod must be statically defined? 
  }
}

Oh and lastly, I cannot modify the "Existing" or Parent class.

So is this the correct approach? How do I solve the static requirement?

share|improve this question
2  
Java has poor capabilites about 'generic' classes and interfaces as compared to c++ AFAIR. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 28 at 19:36
    
@πάνταῥεῖ this is not about poor capabilites, it is just wrong design. –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 28 at 19:37
    
@LuiggiMendoza It was just an opinion thrown in. It may be well true what you say ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 28 at 19:38
    
@πάνταῥεῖ well, IMO your opinion looks more like a rant about Java. If that wasn't your intention, please consider to remove the comment or edit it accordingly. –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 28 at 19:41
1  
@LuiggiMendoza It's not really a rant, but one of the reasons I prefer c++ over java. They have their certain places in various problem domains. I'm just stating, that straightforward metaprogramming isn't one of the strengths of java programming (though this is of less importance in the java environment at all). –  πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 28 at 19:45

1 Answer 1

In the C++ class definition, MyClass extends BaseTemplate. In the Java example, MyClass doesn't extend ParentClass, thus getting the expected problem.

In Java, just change the definition to:

public class MyClass<T extends ParentClass> extends ParentClass {
    @Override
    public int MyMethod() {
        DoSomething();
        return super.MyMethod();
    }
}

Since MyMethod is abstract in ParentClass, this gives a compiler error. Instead, you would need to call MyMethod from an instance of ParentClass. This can be fixed by having a field T t inside MyClass:

public class MyClass<T extends ParentClass> extends ParentClass {
    T t;
    public MyClass(T t) {
        this.t = t;
    }
    @Override
    public int MyMethod() {
        DoSomething();
        return t.MyMethod();
    }
}

Otherwise, using generics and extending ParentClass here won't have any sense at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the quick answer. However calling super.MyMethod() has the issue of Cannot directly invoke the abstract method MyMethod() for the type ParentClass. Secondary to that, in C++ the method called would be the template's not the parent's method. –  user3581890 Apr 28 at 19:44
    
You're on the right track, but this has some errors in it if you use his ParenClass definition above ... consider polishing? –  jgitter Apr 28 at 19:48
    
@user3581890 answer updated. –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 28 at 19:49
    
@LuiggiMendoza So MyClass will have an instance of T and doesn't need to extend ParentClass anymore? –  user3581890 Apr 28 at 20:00
    
@user3581890 yes, you could remove it. Unless you have non-abstract methods in ParentClass that you can use in MyClass. –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 28 at 20:01

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