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I have a regular C# POCO. At the class level, I am decorating the object with [Serializable()].

That said, I am using the Linq Sum() on one of the properties and I am receiving an error upon serialization. If possible, I would like to just simply ignore this property. However, the [XmlIgnore()] is only for Xml Serialization, not Binary. Any ideas or thoughts?

The code is something like this, where I would like to ignore ValueTotal:

[Serializable()]
public class Foo
{
  public IList<Number> Nums { get; set; }

  public long ValueTotal
  {
    get { return Nums.Sum(x => x.value); }
  }
}
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8  
Note the repeated point in the replies; BinaryFormatter doesn't care about properties in the first place... –  Marc Gravell Feb 25 '10 at 16:32

5 Answers 5

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Cheat and use a method

[Serializable()]
public class Foo
{
  public IList<Number> Nums { get; set; }

  public long GetValueTotal()
  {
    return Nums.Sum(x => x.value);
  }
}
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1  
+1 while I sometimes struggle with Properties being equal to state, and state is sometimes calculated, I'm starting to agree more that if you are doing calculations, then you should use a method as it shows the intent that this value is the result of a calculation. The truth is, why would you serialize a value that is calculated, shouldn't you serialize the data that you want, and then just redo the calculation on the other side? –  NerdFury Feb 25 '10 at 15:48
    
I agree NerdFury, this does communicate my intentions better. Thank you. -Jessy Houle –  Jessy Houle Feb 25 '10 at 16:03
    
How does this solve the problem "receiving an error upon serialization"? I assumed Number was not serializable an thus serializing the backing field of the Nums property would fail. –  Henrik Feb 25 '10 at 16:10
16  
IMO this is just plain wrong. BinaryFormatter doesn't look at methods or properties - it only looks at fields. Changing a property to a field should not in any way affect how BinaryFormatter works here. –  Marc Gravell Feb 25 '10 at 16:29
    
@NerdFury Sometimes you want some kind of calculated data available for display in data binding. In this case, a method is no good. –  Benny Jobigan Oct 20 '10 at 13:53

ValueTotal is already ignored. Only data is serialized, not methods. Properties are methods actually.

If you wish to ignore fields and not serialize them mark them as [NonSerialized].

'Or'

you can implement ISerializable and not serialize those field.

Here is some sample code on how can implement ISerializable and serialize data: http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/yougerthen/102162008172741PM/1.aspx

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    [NonSerialized]
    private IList<Number> nums;
    public IList<Number> Nums { get {return nums;} set { nums = value; }  } 
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1  
Read again. He likes to ignore the ValueTotal-Property, not the list –  Scoregraphic Feb 25 '10 at 15:38
10  
No need to ignore ValueTotal property. Binary serialization serializes fields, not properties –  Henrik Feb 25 '10 at 15:40

There is anther way that is not listed here that has some befits(the below was made to support both binary serialization and xml)(for your example you would need a custom class to serialize your interfaces):

    [OnSerializing]
    private void OnSerializing(StreamingContext context)
    {
        xmlShape4Port = new xmlStreamShape(shape4Port);
        shape4Port = null;
    }
    [OnDeserialized]
    private void OnDeserialized(StreamingContext context)
    {
        if (xmlShape4Port != null)
        {
            shape4Port = xmlShape4Port.getShapeFromSaved();
            xmlShape4Port = null;
        }
    }

    [XmlIgnore()]
    public virtual StreamShape shape4Port {get;set;}

    [XmlElement("shape4Port")]
    public xmlStreamShape xmlShape4Port
    {
        get
        {
            if (shape4Port == null)
                return null;
            else
            {
                return new xmlStreamShape(shape4Port);
            }
        }
        set
        {
            shape4Port = value.getShapeFromSaved();
        }
    }
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Implement the ISerializable interface and then use [XmlIgnore] for XML serialzation in the GetObjectData() method but then output as binary. It's actually simpler than how I just described it.

For ideas, see http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/yougerthen/102162008172741PM/1.aspx

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