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I have a large file full of text and in there are some email addresses.

Which php regular expression function would return an array of email addresses it could find?

So far I have

<?php

$pattern = "/^[^@]*@[^@]*\.[^@]*$/";

if ($handle = opendir('files')) {

/* This is the correct way to loop over the directory. */
while (false !== ($file = readdir($handle))) {
   preg_match($pattern, $file, $matches);

   echo count($matches);
   foreach ($matches as $email) {
     echo "$email <br />";
   }
}

closedir($handle);
}

but it returns no results

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Your regex will match "Twitter-style" names at the end of a sentence with a trailing space or even punctuation (eg "Hey @azz0r."). Edit: Looking again, it will even match at the beginning of a string. –  eyelidlessness Feb 25 '10 at 15:40

7 Answers 7

Worthy of note, after scouring google for regex, with my script, here are the patterns I collected:

    $pattern = "^[_a-z0-9-]+(\.[_a-z0-9-]+)*@[a-z0-9-]+(\.[a-z0-9-]+)*(\.[a-z]{2,4})$";
$pattern = "/([\s]*)([_a-zA-Z0-9-]+(\.[_a-zA-Z0-9-]+)*([ ]+|)@([ ]+|)([a-zA-Z0-9-]+\.)+([a-zA-Z]{2,}))([\s]*)/i";
$pattern = '#([^@]+@[-a-z0-9.]+)#';
$pattern = '(^|\s|<)[a-zA-Z]([.+-]?\w+)+@(\w{2,}\.)+\w{2,5}($|\s|>)';
$pattern = "^[a-zA-Z0-9_.-]+@[a-zA-Z0-9-]+.[a-zA-Z0-9-.]+$";
$pattern = "[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?";
$pattern = "(^|\s|<)[a-zA-Z]([.+-]?\w+)+@(\w{2,}\.)+\w{2,5}($|\s|>)";

The best pattern is:

$pattern = "/([\s]*)([_a-zA-Z0-9-]+(\.[_a-zA-Z0-9-]+)*([ ]+|)@([ ]+|)([a-zA-Z0-9-]+\.)+([a-zA-Z]{2,}))([\s]*)/i";
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I see three problems:

  1. In regular expressions, ^ means the start of a line (or string) and $ means the end of a line (or string), that is probably why the pattern you are using doesn't work. It would only find an email address on a line by itself.

  2. You are passing the file's name to preg_match; it is expecting a string to be searched. You need to call file_get_contents or something like it to pass the file's text to the function.

  3. You need to use preg_match_all to find more than one match at a time, if there are multiple addresses in each file.

share|improve this answer

Try something like:

$file = file_get_contents('filename.txt');
if(preg_match_all('#([^@]+@[-a-z0-9.]+)#',$file,$matches)) {
  $emails = $matches[1]; // array of all the emails in the file.
}

The regex is simplified and not a 100% RFC822 implementation.

EDIT:

The readdir function returns the filename on success not the file contents. You can try doing:

while (false !== ($file = readdir($handle))) {
   $file_contents = file_get_contents($file);
   if(preg_match_all('#([^@]+@[-a-z0-9.]+)#', $file_content, $matches)) {

     echo count($matches[1]);
     foreach ($matches[1] as $email) {
       echo "$email <br />";
   }
}
share|improve this answer
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Final code, that works perfect, thanks everyone :)

<?php

set_time_limit('0');
$pattern = "^[_a-z0-9-]+(\.[_a-z0-9-]+)*@[a-z0-9-]+(\.[a-z0-9-]+)*(\.[a-z]{2,4})$";

if ($handle = opendir('files')) {
    while (false !== ($file = readdir($handle))) {
        $content = file_get_contents('files/'.$file);
        preg_match_all('#([^@]+@[-a-z0-9.]+)#', $content, $matches);
        echo count($matches[1]).' - '.$file.'<br />';
    }
    closedir($handle);
}
share|improve this answer
4  
That code is declaring $pattern then not using it. –  benzado Feb 25 '10 at 21:02

Read through

You can adapt the Regex given there or any other Regex you can find on the web for this purpose and then simply do a

preg_match_all($pattern, $someString, $matches);

$matches will then contain whatever was found for the Regex you used.

In case your file is too big to be loaded into memory, consider iterating over it with fgets().

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There are a number of sites talking about regexes for email addresses. This one in particular is quite expansive.

The short answer is that the definition of a 'valid' email address does not lend itself to a simple regex. Most practical regular expressions for email addresses trade completeness for simplicity.

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Try this one:

(^|\s|<)[a-zA-Z]([.+-]?\w+)+@(\w{2,}\.)+\w{2,5}($|\s|>)

Add other possible delimiters to the starting and ending groups ^|\s|<

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