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Hi i have a simple table of live course data

t_course_live -->
id (INT) (PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT)
trade_timestamp DATETIME
rate FLOAT

id | trade_timestamp     | rate
1  | 2014-04-28 20:53:32 | 1.38629
2  | 2014-04-28 20:53:34 | 1.38623
3  | 2014-04-28 20:53:39 | 1.38625

So I make sure that there is hole in the auto_increment sequence and the trade_timestamps do always increment with the ids => trade_timestamp(id) < trade_timestamp(id+1)

I want to join each row with the "next parent". That means the row with the id+1 so i can calculate the difference between the timestamps. My SQL approach looks like the following, which does the job, but takes way too long, cause there are already 900k+ entries.

SELECT ... (do the calculation with t1.trade_timesamp and t2.trade_timestamp) ...
FROM t_course_live t1
LEFT JOIN (
  SELECT t2_inner.*, (t2_inner.id+1) AS next_row 
  FROM t_course_live t2_inner
  WHERE DATE(t2_inner.trade_timestamp) = '2014-04-28'
) AS t2 ON t1.id = t2.next_row
WHERE DATE(t1.trade_timestamp) = '2014-04-28'

With the EXPLAIN statement you get:

  id    |   select_type |   table   |   type    |   possible_keys   |   key     |   key_len |   ref     |   rows    |   Extra
    1   |   SIMPLE      |   t1      |   ALL     |   NULL            |   NULL    |   NULL    |   NULL    |   943429  |   Using where
    1   |   SIMPLE      |  t2_inner |   ALL     |   NULL            |   NULL    |   NULL    |   NULL    |   943429  |   Using where; Using join buffer (flat, BNL join)

So the question is, how to make this query faster, joining the id with the id+1? If it's possible, i would like to go without a parent_id column.

share|improve this question
    
Add an index or two –  Strawberry Apr 29 at 0:26
    
there is already an index on the ID field, which i want to join. But the EXPLAIN shows, when manipulating the index field, in my case id+1 then the sql does not use it as a an index join –  alabama Apr 29 at 7:11
    
You have timestamps differ by ~5 seconds in an example. Do you only need to merge your data by timestamps if they don't differ by too much? Or do you need to merge timestamps from only one day, so say (323, 2014-04-28 23:59:52) and (324, 2014-04-29 00:00:08) will not merge? –  Vesper Apr 29 at 7:41
1  
Add an index on trade_timestamp. Note that DATE() cannot take advantage of such an index, but "trade_timestamp BETWEEN x AND y" can! If you're still struggling, consider providing proper DDLs (and/or an sqlfiddle) TOGETHER WITH THE DESIRED RESULT SET. –  Strawberry Apr 29 at 8:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Rewrite this query into:

SELECT ... (do the calculation with t1.trade_timesamp and t2.trade_timestamp) ...
FROM t_course_live t1
LEFT JOIN t_course_live t2
ON t1.id = t2.id+1
WHERE
  t1.trade_timestamp>= '2014-04-28'
  AND t1.trade_timestamp < '2014-04-29'
  and t2.trade_timestamp>= '2014-04-28'
  AND t2.trade_timestamp < '2014-04-29'

Using DATE(column) function and joinin with a subquery prevents MySql from using indexes.

I assume that an index on trade_timestamp has already been created.

=========== EDIT =========================

There is a subtle mistake in my previous answer.
The above query is not equivalent to the orginal query, because these conditions:

  and t2.trade_timestamp>= '2014-04-28'
  AND t2.trade_timestamp < '2014-04-29'

converts the query from left join into regular join.

A correct query is:

SELECT ... (do the calculation with t1.trade_timesamp and t2.trade_timestamp) ...
FROM t_course_live t1
LEFT JOIN t_course_live t2
ON t1.id = t2.id+1
   AND t2.trade_timestamp>= '2014-04-28'
   AND t2.trade_timestamp < '2014-04-29'
WHERE
  t1.trade_timestamp>= '2014-04-28'
  AND t1.trade_timestamp < '2014-04-29'
share|improve this answer
    
That's, the answere! Nice one! The index was created on trade_timestamp. Without the DATE function the query takes ~0,094 sec to get 26.000 rows. Thx a lot for the tip. –  alabama Apr 29 at 21:14

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