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I'm using Xcode with C++ 11 for a std::map. Some elements in my map have a flag that says they need to be removed.

I want to iterate through the map, erasing the flagged elements in O(n) time. The call to erase does not return an iterator. I have seen some kind of erase(it++) implementation, but I have no evidence that such a call can work since the iterator will become invalid after the erase operation but before the increment operation.

My current code seems so inefficient.

for(auto it = myMap.begin(); it != myMap.end(); ++it)
{
    delete *it;
    myMap.erase(it);
    it = myMap.begin(); //how can I avoid iterating through the map again
}
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marked as duplicate by Bryan Chen, awesomeyi, Cubbi, trudyscousin, Avanz Apr 29 '14 at 4:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
use unique_ptr<> to manage object lifetime then use erase/remove_if with a lambda that checks your removal flag. See en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/algorithm/remove for an example. –  mythagel Apr 29 '14 at 1:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From the online documentation:

"Iterators, pointers and references referring to elements removed by the function are invalidated. All other iterators, pointers and references keep their validity."

So maybe this:

for(auto it = myMap.begin(); it != myMap.end();)
{
    auto itPrev = it;
    ++it;

    if(shouldBeDeleted(*itPrev))
       myMap.erase(itPrev);
}

Edit: The erase(it++) idea you mention is actually ok, because the increment occurs (and returns a copy of the old, pre-increment value) before erase() is called. It's in effect the equivalent of:

template<typename IteratorT>
IteratorT PostIncrement(IteratorT& it)
{
   auto copy = it;
   ++it;
   return copy;
}

for(auto it = myMap.begin(); it != myMap.end();)
   myMap.erase(PostIncrement(it));

which amounts to the same thing as the other example. Incidentally, this is why you should normally use the prefix ++ with iterators; that copy operation is extra overhead, and you usually don't need it.

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what online documentation are you referring to? –  Gandalf458 Apr 29 '14 at 1:20
    
The one I looked at is here: cplusplus.com/reference/map/map/erase. That page also says C++11 should have erase overloads that return iterators, but maybe they were left out of the implementation you're using. –  dlf Apr 29 '14 at 1:22
    
OK, I did not notice the C++11 tab that I could click there. That seems to make sense, and I will mark it as correct if there are no errors. –  Gandalf458 Apr 29 '14 at 1:33
    
Edited my answer with additional info. –  dlf Apr 29 '14 at 1:48
    
The version of std::map::erase() that takes an interator as input and returns an iterator to the next element as output is not new in C++11, it existed in earlier versions as well. –  Remy Lebeau Apr 29 '14 at 2:22

When std::map::erase() is passed an iterator, it returns an iterator to the next element that follows the element being erased. This allows you to continue your iteration without starting over.

Try this:

auto it = myMap.begin();
while (it != myMap.end())
{
    if (it->flagged)
    {
        delete *it;
        it = myMap.erase(it);
    }
    else
        ++it;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is not true for Xcode's implementation of C++ 11 standard. –  Gandalf458 Apr 29 '14 at 16:37

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