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I do not know how to work with structures inside a class. I think I have the first part right but nothing works in the main. When I try running my program it says "function does not take 0 arguments" Should I write everything in the main like this:

P.Read(BOX m);

Here's my code so far as below:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;
template <class T, int n>
class SIX
{
private:
    struct BOX
    {
        T a[n];
        string name;
    };
public:
    void Read(BOX m)
    {
        cout<<"Enter your name: ";
        cin>>m.name;
        cout<<m.name<<" please enter "<<n<<" data: ";
        for(int i=0;i<n;++i)
            cin>>m.a[i];
    }
    void SortArray(BOX m)
    {
        sort(m.a, m.a+n);
    }
    void Display(BOX m)
    {
        cout<<m.name<<" this is the sorted list of data in your array a: ";
        for(int i=0;i<n;++i)
            cout<<m.a[i]<<'\t';
        cout<<endl;
    }
};
int main()
{
    SIX <int, 6> P; 
    SIX <string, 5> Q;

    P.Read();
    P.SortArray();
    P.Display();
    cout<<endl;

    Q.Read();
    Q.SortArray();
    Q.Display();
    cout<<endl;

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

No, define Read as

void Read()
{
    cout<<"Enter your name: ";
    cin>>BOX.name;
    cout<<BOX.name<<" please enter "<<n<<" data: ";
    for(int i=0;i<n;++i)
        cin>>BOX.a[i];
}

Read is a member function, and it has access to Box, so that's all you have to do. Same for the other functions, you don't need to specify BOX m as the parameter, replace it by () and replace m by BOX inside the code.

As @Barmar pointed out, your struct BOX just defines a type, you should define a member variable named BOX. Simplest way to do it is to just move BOX to the end of struct declaration,

struct
{
    T a[n];
    string name;
} BOX;
share|improve this answer
    
BOX isn't a variable, it's a structure type. –  Barmar Apr 29 '14 at 1:41
    
Ohh yeah, you're right, but he should make it a member variable. I read it fast and thought first that he defined the variable, as he's actually not using the type outside the class. –  vsoftco Apr 29 '14 at 1:43
    
this is what i get when i try to run it "sort" identifier not found while compiling class template member function 'void SIX<T,n>::SortArray(void)' with [ T=int, n=6 ] –  user3326689 Apr 29 '14 at 1:54
    
You need to do #include <algorithm> at the top to include the code for std::sort(). –  user823981 Apr 29 '14 at 2:07
    
I got it to work, I had forgotten to add the #include <algorithm> but the changes you guys suggested helped too! Thank you –  user3326689 Apr 29 '14 at 2:07

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