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trait NotNull {}

I've been trying to see how this trait can guarantee that something is not null and I can't figure it out:

def main(args: Array[String]) {
  val i = List(1, 2) 
  foo(i) //(*)
}

def foo(a: Any) = println(a.hashCode)

def foo(@NotNull a: Any) = println(a.hashCode) //compile error: trait NotNull is abstract

def foo(a: Any with NotNull) = println(a.hashCode) //compile error: type mismatch at (*)

And:

val i = new Object with NotNull //compile-error illegal inheritance

There is obviously some special compiler treatment going on because this compiles:

trait MyTrait {}

def main(args: Array[String]) {
  val i: MyTrait = null
  println(i)
}

Whereas this does not:

def main(args: Array[String]) {
  val i: NotNull = null //compile error: found Null(null) required NotNull
  println(i)
} 

EDIT: there's nothing about this I can find in programming in Scala

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val a : NotNull = "asdf". Crashes the 2.7.5 compiler: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.AssertionError: assertion failed: type erro r: can't convert from REFERENCE(java.lang.String) to REFERENCE(scala.NotNull) in unit <console> –  Thomas Jung Feb 25 '10 at 16:17
2  
NotNull doesn't really work yet. As far as I know, it is work in progress, much like Manifest in Scala 2.7. –  Daniel C. Sobral Feb 25 '10 at 17:19
1  
@Daniel - well, it's been in the language since 2.5 according to the docs, so I think it should be working by now or just get removed! –  oxbow_lakes Feb 25 '10 at 18:38
    
Started 05/01/07 : lampsvn.epfl.ch/trac/scala/changeset/10892 –  Thomas Jung Feb 25 '10 at 18:43
    
That's understandable, but, as far as I know, this is something they do want to have in a usable manner. Then again, I might be completely wrong. –  Daniel C. Sobral Feb 25 '10 at 23:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try and error:

scala> class A extends NotNull
defined class A

scala> val a : A = null
<console>:5: error: type mismatch;
 found   : Null(null)
 required: A
       val a : A = null
                   ^

scala> class B
defined class B

scala> val b : B = null
b: B = null

This works only with Scala 2.7.5:

scala> new Object with NotNull
res1: java.lang.Object with NotNull = $anon$1@39859

scala> val i = new Object with NotNull
i: java.lang.Object with NotNull = $anon$1@d39c9f

And the Scala Language Reference:

If that member has a type which conforms to scala.NotNull, the member’s valuemust be initialized to a value different from null, otherwise a scala.UnitializedError is thrown.

For every class type T such that T <: scala.AnyRef and not T <: scala.NotNull one has scala.Null <: T.

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2  
The corollary to this is, then. Why do scala's own classes (such as List not extend the NotNull trait? –  oxbow_lakes Feb 25 '10 at 16:27
    
And the other question, which is "do you use this trait?" –  oxbow_lakes Feb 25 '10 at 18:04
    
If you're implementing Scala traits in Java (and other languages) the NotNull trait will be ignored. Another aspect is that a @NotNull annotation and static code analysis will be in Java 7. Don't see other reasons not to use it in Scala libs. –  Thomas Jung Feb 25 '10 at 18:33
    
Do you use this trait? No. Have missed this part of the question. –  Thomas Jung Feb 25 '10 at 18:34

NotNull is not yet finished. The intention is to evolve this into a usable way to check for non-nullness but it's not yet there. For the moment I would not use it. I have no concrete predictions when it will be done, only that it won't arrive for 2.8.0.

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6  
Am I right in saying it's been in the library/language since 2.5? It doesn't reflect well that there are features in scala that just don't work. –  oxbow_lakes Mar 4 '10 at 23:32
1  
Is it usable in scala 2.9.1? –  Freewind Mar 13 '12 at 10:10

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