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is it possible some way to "print" in python in a fortran like way like this?

1     4.5656
2    24.0900
3   698.2300
4    -3.5000

So the decimal points is always in the same column, and we get always 3 or n decimal numbers?

Thanks

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and just last question,if I have to print 1000 lines and I have three floats on each, how can I do that for: 10spaces,f1 formatted,5spaces,f2 formatted,5spaces,f3 formatted where fi formatted is%11.4f –  flow Feb 25 '10 at 17:11
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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted
>>> '%11.4f' % -3.5
'    -3.5000'

or the new style formatting:

>>> '{:11.4f}'.format(-3.5)
'    -3.5000'

more about format specifiers in the docs.

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3  
oooh new style... shiny :) –  Stefano Borini Feb 25 '10 at 16:57
    
hi thanks! and last thign, let's say i have three floats f1, f2, f3, how can I print them? I tried '%11.4f' % f1,f2,f3 but nothing –  flow Feb 25 '10 at 17:06
    
@werner: use '%11.4f %11.4f %11.4f' % (f1,f2,f3) –  Adrien Plisson Feb 25 '10 at 17:12
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You could also take a look at the fortranformat library on PyPI or the project page if you wanted to fully recreate FORTRAN text IO.

If you have any questions, send me an email (I wrote it).

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for i in [(3, 4.534), (3, 15.234325), (10,341.11)]:
...     print "%5i %8.4f" % i
... 
    3   4.5340
    3  15.2343
   10 341.1100
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print "%10.3f" % f

will right align the number f (as an aside: %-10.3f would be left-aligned). The string will be right-aligned to 10 characters (it doesn't work any more with > 10 characters) and exactly 3 decimal digits. So:

f = 698.230 # <-- 7 characters when printed with %10.3f
print "%10.3f" % f # <-- will print "   698.2300" (two spaces)

As a test for your example set do the following:

print "\n".join(map(lambda f: "%10.3f" % f, [4.5656, 24.09, 698.23, -3.5]))
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You can use string.rjust(), this way:

a = 4.5656
b = 24.0900
c = 698.2300
d = -3.5000

a = "%.4f" % a
b = "%.4f" % b
c = "%.4f" % c
d = "%.4f" % d

l = max(len(a), len(b), len(c), len(d))

for i in [a, b, c, d]:
        print i.rjust(l+2)

Which gives:

~ $ python test.py 
    4.5656
   24.0900
  698.2300
   -3.5000
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