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I'm trying to implement XOR in javascript in the following way:

   // XOR validation
   if ((isEmptyString(firstStr) && !isEmptyString(secondStr)) ||
    (!isEmptyString(firstStr) && isEmptyString(secondStr))
   {
    alert(SOME_VALIDATION_MSG);
    return;
   }

Is there a better way to do this in javascript?

Thanks.

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1  
I understand this is a very good question, but I strongly disagree that the first answer is the best. There are much simpler solutions if you scroll down... –  Nico Nov 27 '13 at 15:48

17 Answers 17

up vote 33 down vote accepted

I pretend that you are looking for a logical XOR, as javascript already has a bitwise one (^) :)

I usually use a simple ternary operator (one of the rare times I use one):

if ((isEmptyString(firstStr) ? !isEmptyString(secondStr) 
                             : isEmptyString(secondStr))) {
alert(SOME_VALIDATION_MSG);
    return;
}

Edit:

working on the @Jeff Meatball Yang solution

if ((!isEmptyString(firstStr) ^ !isEmptyString(secondStr))) {
  alert(SOME_VALIDATION_MSG);
  return;
}

you negate the values in order to transform them in booleans and then apply the bitwise xor operator. Maybe it is not so maintainable as the first solution (or maybe I'm too accustomed to the first one)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll use this suggestion. –  amoran Feb 25 '10 at 17:31
1  
Just another thought: I like the use of the bitwise XOR because I think the ternary operator is harder for someone else to read/understand as an XOR. –  Jeff Meatball Yang Feb 25 '10 at 17:55
4  
!x ^ !y is actually an XNOR of x and y. !(!x ^ !y) would be XOR. –  Trey Hunner Nov 7 '12 at 7:31
8  
"the cleanest and the best" (quote from jonathonhill.net/2009-02-12/logical-xor-in-javascript) : ((test1) != (test2)) –  Benj May 14 '13 at 15:27
3  
@Trey The !x ^ !y used in the answer is the correct formulation for XOR - NXOR would be logical equivalency, the negation of XOR and thus !( !x ^ !y ). This fiddle shows the truth tables for both !x ^ !y and !( !x ^ !y ) - the former conforming to XOR and the latter to NXOR. @Jamie !!x ^ !!y could be substituted in for XOR ( !x ^ !y ), but not for !( !x ^ !y ) –  Brian North Dec 21 '13 at 20:51

As others have pointed out, logical XOR is the same as not-equal for booleans, so you can do this:


  // XOR validation
  if( isEmptyString(firstStr) != isEmptyString(secondStr) )
    {
      alert(SOME_VALIDATION_MSG);
      return;
    }
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Amazing! Actually, it's so simple! Why I haven't heard nobody before saying that? –  Р̀СТȢѸ́ФХѾЦЧШЩЪЫЬѢѤЮѦѪѨѬѠѺѮѰѲѴ Nov 10 at 11:21
    
This should be the accepted answer. So much clearer to the reader than futzing about with negations and bitwise xor. –  jpatokal Dec 10 at 21:20

You are doing an XOR of boolean values which is easy to model into a bitwise XOR (which Javascript has):

var a = isEmptyString(firstStr) ? 1 : 0;
var b = isEmptyString(secondStr) ? 1 : 0;

if(a ^ b) { ... }

http://www.howtocreate.co.uk/xor.html

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2  
+1 ... This is how I was always taught to do XOR. –  Robusto Feb 25 '10 at 17:19
3  
thinking on your answer... why not !isEmptyString(firstStr) ^ !isEmptyString(secondStr) –  Eineki Feb 25 '10 at 17:25

You could use the bitwise XOR operator (^) directly:

if (isEmptyString(firstStr) ^ isEmptyString(secondStr)) {
  // ...
}

It will work for your example since the boolean true and false values are converted into 1 and 0 because the bitwise operators work with 32-bit integers.

That expression will return also either 0 or 1, and that value will be coerced back to Boolean by the if statement.

You should be aware of the type coercion that occurs with the above approach, if you are looking for good performance, I wouldn't recommend you to work with the bitwise operators, you could also make a simple function to do it using only Boolean logical operators:

function xor(x, y) {
  return (x || y) && !(x && y);
}


if (xor(isEmptyString(firstStr), isEmptyString(secondStr))) {
  // ...
}
share|improve this answer

Easier one method:

if ((x+y) % 2) {
    //statement
}

assuming of course that both variables are true booleans, that is, 1 or 0.

  • If x === y you'll get an even number, so XOR will be 0.
  • And if x !== y then you'll get an odd number, so XOR will be 1 :)

A second option, if you notice that x != y evaluates as a XOR, then all you must do is

if (x != y) {
    //statement
}

Which will just evaluate, again, as a XOR. (I like this much better)

Of course, a nice idea would be to implement this into a function, but it's your choice only.

Hope any of the two methods help someone! I mark this answer as community wiki, so it can be improved.

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You get that if both x AND y are false then it should evaluate to false right? x=0 and y=0 should evaluate to false, so both of your examples are NOT an implementation of XOR. –  njfife Nov 1 '13 at 20:26
    
The first one I don't see why it is wrong: false&false evaluates to false, and true&true evaluates to false too, since they both add to a multiple of 2... And, for the second one, x!=y only evaluates to true when a variable is true and the other is not. Even 0!=FALSE evaluates to FALSE, so I don't see your point, sorry... –  Nico Nov 1 '13 at 20:51
1  
I honestly have no idea why I thought that, sorry about that, you are correct. Those are both concise and clean solutions. –  njfife Nov 4 '13 at 19:37

Checkout this explanation of different implementations of XOR in javascript.

Just to summarize a few of them right here:

if( ( isEmptyString(firstStr) || isEmptyString(secondStr)) && !( isEmptyString(firstStr) && isEmptyString(secondStr)) ) {
   alert(SOME_VALIDATION_MSG); 
   return; 
}

OR

if( isEmptyString(firstStr)? !isEmptyString(secondStr): isEmptyString(secondStr)) {
   alert(SOME_VALIDATION_MSG); 
   return;
}

OR

if( (isEmptyString(firstStr) ? 1 : 0 ) ^ (isEmptyString(secondStr) ? 1 : 0 ) ) {
   alert(SOME_VALIDATION_MSG); 
   return;
}

OR

if( !isEmptyString(firstStr)!= !isEmptyString(secondStr)) {
   alert(SOME_VALIDATION_MSG); 
   return;
}
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lol. 4 secs difference :) –  Roberto Aloi Feb 25 '10 at 17:16
    
Could you please provide answers here, rather than pushing users off of the site to get what they're looking for? –  Jonathan Sampson Feb 25 '10 at 17:18
    
@Jonathan Sampson - I could if you think that would be helpful. But what exactly would be the reason to copy the code into the post? The resource already exists –  froadie Feb 25 '10 at 17:28
2  
@foadie: Because Stack Overflow is for answers, not links to answers. If your link broke tomorrow, your answer would lose all value. –  Jonathan Sampson Feb 25 '10 at 17:30
    
@Jonathan Sampson - criticism taken –  froadie Feb 25 '10 at 17:38

Quoting from this article:

Unfortunately, JavaScript does not have a logical XOR operator.

You can "emulate" the behaviour of the XOR operator with something like:

if( !foo != !bar ) {
  ...
}

The linked article discusses a couple of alternative approaches.

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3  
Could you please provide answers here, rather than pushing users off of the site to get what they're looking for? –  Jonathan Sampson Feb 25 '10 at 17:17
3  
Copy and paste? No. Why don't you explain the same (or similar) solutions here for the good of those who come across this question. If your link broke tomorrow, your answer would serve no purpose. –  Jonathan Sampson Feb 25 '10 at 17:29
1  
Good article. The best answer is on the bottom of the page. Why not just post that with a brief explanation? –  simon Feb 25 '10 at 17:57
    
The !'s are unnecessary, all you need to do is test for inequality. –  jpatokal Dec 10 at 21:18

XOR just means "are these two boolean values different?". Therefore:

if (!!isEmptyString(firstStr) != !!isEmptyString(secondStr)) {
    // ...
}

The !!s are just to guarantee that the != operator compares two genuine boolean values, since conceivably isEmptyString() returns something else (like null for false, or the string itself for true).

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Assuming you are looking for the BOOLEAN XOR, here is a simple implementation.

function xor(expr1, expr2){
    return ((expr1 || expr2) && !(expr1 && expr2));
}

The above derives from the definition of an "exclusive disjunction" {either one, but not both}.

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Since the boolean values true and false are converted to 1 and 0 respectively when using bitwise operators on them, the bitwise-XOR ^ can do double-duty as a logical XOR as well as a bitwiseone, so long as your values are boolean values (Javascript's "truthy" values wont work). This is easy to acheive with the negation ! operator.

a XOR b is logially equivalent to the following (short) list of expressions:

!a ^ !b;
!a != !b;

There are plenty of other forms possible - such as !a ? !!b : !b - but these two patterns have the advantage of only evaluating a and b once each (and will not "short-circuit" too if a is false and thus not evaluate b), while forms using ternary ?:, OR ||, or AND && operators will either double-evaluate or short-circuit.

The negation ! operators in both statements is important to include for a couple reasons: it converts all "truthy" values into boolean values ( "" -> false, 12 -> true, etc.) so that the bitwise operator has values it can work with, so the inequality != operator only compares each expression's truth value (a != b would not work properly if a or b were non-equal, non-empty strings, etc.), and so that each evaluation returns a boolean value result instead of the first "truthy" value.

You can keep expanding on these forms by adding double negations (or the exception, !!a ^ !!b, which is still equivalent to XOR), but be careful when negating just part of the expression. These forms may seem at first glance to "work" if you're thinking in terms of distribution in arithmatic (where 2(a + b) == 2a + 2b, etc.), but in fact produce different truth tables from XOR (these produce similar results to logical NXOR):

!( a ^ b )
!( !!a ^ !!b )
!!a == !!b

The general form for XOR, then, could be the function (truth table fiddle):

function xor( a, b ) { return !a ^ !b; }

And your specific example would then be:

if ( xor( isEmptyString( firstStr ), isEmptyString( secondStr ) ) ) { ... }

Or if isEmptyString returns only boolean values and you don't want a general xor function, simply:

if ( isEmptyString( firstStr ) ^ isEmptyString( secondStr ) ) { ... }
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Javascript does not have a logical XOR operator, so your construct seems plausible. Had it been numbers then you could have used ^ i.e. bitwise XOR operator.

cheers

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Booleans coerce to 1 and 0 as you would expect, so you can use the XOR operator with booleans. –  Mike Samuel Feb 25 '10 at 19:24

here's an XOR that can accommodate from two to many arguments

function XOR() {
    for (var i = 1; i < arguments.length; i++) 
        if ( arguments[0] != arguments[i] ) 
            return false; 
    return true; 
}

Example of use:

if ( XOR( isEmptyString(firstStr), isEmptyString(secondStr) ) ) {
    alert(SOME_VALIDATION_MSG);
    return;
}
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1  
XOR applied to many arguments is defined true if the number of arguments is odd, and false otherwise. You can't bail out early. –  George Sep 29 '12 at 2:19

I hope this will be the shortest and cleanest one

function xor(x,y){return true==(x!==y);}

This will work for any type

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isn't it just the same as doing ... return (x!==y); ... ? –  Nico Nov 5 '13 at 10:51

Here is an XOR function that takes a variable number of arguments (including two). The arguments only need to be truthy or falsy, not true or false.

function xor() {
    for (var i=arguments.length-1, trueCount=0; i>=0; --i)
        if (arguments[i])
            ++trueCount;
    return trueCount & 1;
}

On Chrome on my 2007 MacBook, it runs in 14 ns for three arguments. Oddly, this slightly different version takes 2935 ns for three arguments:

function xorSlow() {
    for (var i=arguments.length-1, result=false; i>=0; --i)
        if (arguments[i])
            result ^= true;
    return result;
}
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Try this: function xor(x,y) var result = x || y if (x === y) { result = false } return result }

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There's a few methods, but the ternary method (a ? !b : b) appears to perform best. Also, setting Boolean.prototype.xor appears to be an option if you need to xor things often.

http://jsperf.com/xor-implementations

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You could do this:

Math.abs( isEmptyString(firstStr) - isEmptyString(secondStr) )

The result of that is the result of a XOR operation.

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