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I have a task to calculate xor-sum of bytes in an array:

X = char1 XOR char2 XOR char3 ... charN;

I'm trying to parallelize it, xoring __m128 instead. This should give speed up factor 4. Also, to recheck the algorithm I use int. This should give speed up factor 4. The test program is 100 lines long, I can't make it shorter, but it is simple:

#include "xmmintrin.h" // simulation of the SSE instruction
#include <ctime>

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

#include <stdlib.h> // rand

const int NIter = 100;

const int N = 40000000; // matrix size. Has to be dividable by 4.
unsigned char str[N] __attribute__ ((aligned(16)));

template< typename T >
T Sum(const T* data, const int N)
{
    T sum = 0;
    for ( int i = 0; i < N; ++i )
      sum = sum ^ data[i];
    return sum;
}

template<>
__m128 Sum(const __m128* data, const int N)
{
    __m128 sum = _mm_set_ps1(0);
    for ( int i = 0; i < N; ++i )
        sum = _mm_xor_ps(sum,data[i]);
    return sum;
}

int main() {

    // fill string by random values
  for( int i = 0; i < N; i++ ) {
    str[i] = 256 * ( double(rand()) / RAND_MAX ); // put a random value, from 0 to 255
  } 

    /// -- CALCULATE --

    /// SCALAR

  unsigned char sumS = 0;
  std::clock_t c_start = std::clock();
  for( int ii = 0; ii < NIter; ii++ )
    sumS = Sum<unsigned char>( str, N );
  double tScal = 1000.0 * (std::clock()-c_start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;

    /// SIMD

  unsigned char sumV = 0;

  const int m128CharLen = 4*4;
  const int NV = N/m128CharLen;

  c_start = std::clock();
  for( int ii = 0; ii < NIter; ii++ ) {
    __m128 sumVV = _mm_set_ps1(0);
    sumVV = Sum<__m128>( reinterpret_cast<__m128*>(str), NV );
    unsigned char *sumVS = reinterpret_cast<unsigned char*>(&sumVV);

    sumV = sumVS[0];
    for ( int iE = 1; iE < m128CharLen; ++iE )
      sumV ^= sumVS[iE];
  }
  double tSIMD = 1000.0 * (std::clock()-c_start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;

    /// SCALAR INTEGER

  unsigned char sumI = 0;

  const int intCharLen = 4;
  const int NI = N/intCharLen;

  c_start = std::clock();
  for( int ii = 0; ii < NIter; ii++ ) {
    int sumII = Sum<int>( reinterpret_cast<int*>(str), NI );
    unsigned char *sumIS = reinterpret_cast<unsigned char*>(&sumII);

    sumI = sumIS[0];
    for ( int iE = 1; iE < intCharLen; ++iE )
      sumI ^= sumIS[iE];
  }
  double tINT = 1000.0 * (std::clock()-c_start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;

    /// -- OUTPUT --

  cout << "Time scalar: " << tScal << " ms " << endl;
  cout << "Time INT:   " << tINT << " ms, speed up " << tScal/tINT << endl;
  cout << "Time SIMD:   " << tSIMD << " ms, speed up " << tScal/tSIMD << endl;

  if(sumV == sumS && sumI == sumS )
    std::cout << "Results are the same." << std::endl;
  else
    std::cout << "ERROR! Results are not the same." << std::endl;

  return 1;
}

The typical results:

[10:46:20]$ g++ test.cpp -O3 -fno-tree-vectorize; ./a.out
Time scalar: 3540 ms 
Time INT:   890 ms, speed up 3.97753
Time SIMD:   280 ms, speed up 12.6429
Results are the same.
[10:46:27]$ g++ test.cpp -O3 -fno-tree-vectorize; ./a.out
Time scalar: 3540 ms 
Time INT:   890 ms, speed up 3.97753
Time SIMD:   280 ms, speed up 12.6429
Results are the same.
[10:46:35]$ g++ test.cpp -O3 -fno-tree-vectorize; ./a.out
Time scalar: 3640 ms 
Time INT:   880 ms, speed up 4.13636
Time SIMD:   290 ms, speed up 12.5517
Results are the same.

As you see, int version works ideally, but simd version loses 25% of the speed and this is stable. I tried to change the array sizes, this doesn't help.

Also, if I switch to -O2 I lose 75% of the speed in simd version:

[10:50:25]$ g++ test.cpp -O2 -fno-tree-vectorize; ./a.out
Time scalar: 3640 ms 
Time INT:   880 ms, speed up 4.13636
Time SIMD:   890 ms, speed up 4.08989
Results are the same.
[10:51:16]$ g++ test.cpp -O2 -fno-tree-vectorize; ./a.out
Time scalar: 3640 ms 
Time INT:   900 ms, speed up 4.04444
Time SIMD:   880 ms, speed up 4.13636
Results are the same.

Can someone explain me this?

Additional info:

  1. I have g++ (GCC) 4.7.3; Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E7-4860

  2. I use -fno-tree-vectorize to prevent auto vectorization. Without this flag with -O3 the expected speed up is 1, since the task is simple. This is what I get:

    [10:55:40]$ g++ test.cpp -O3; ./a.out
    Time scalar: 270 ms 
    Time INT:   270 ms, speed up 1
    Time SIMD:   280 ms, speed up 0.964286
    Results are the same.
    

    but with -O2 result is still strange:

    [10:55:02]$ g++ test.cpp -O2; ./a.out
    Time scalar: 3540 ms 
    Time INT:   990 ms, speed up 3.57576
    Time SIMD:   880 ms, speed up 4.02273
    Results are the same.
    
  3. When I change

    for ( int i = 0; i < N; i+=1 )
      sum = sum ^ data[i];
    

    to equivalent of:

    for ( int i = 0; i < N; i+=8 )
      sum = (data[i] ^ data[i+1]) ^ (data[i+2] ^ data[i+3]) ^ (data[i+4] ^ data[i+5]) ^ (data[i+6] ^ data[i+7]) ^ sum;
    

    i do see improvment in scalar speed by factor of 2. But I don't see improvements in speed up. Before: intSpeedUp 3.98416, SIMDSpeedUP 12.5283. After: intSpeedUp 3.5572, SIMDSpeedUP 6.8523.

share|improve this question
    
can you turn on the -vec-report3 flag and see if the loops really got vectorized –  arunmoezhi Apr 29 '14 at 9:00
    
@arunmoezhi, what do you mean? Which loops must be vectorized?? -vec-report3 is not recognised by my gcc. –  klm123 Apr 29 '14 at 9:01
    
the scalar version. Why didn't the compiler optimize it –  arunmoezhi Apr 29 '14 at 9:05
    
@arunmoezhi, because of -fno-tree-vectorize flag. –  klm123 Apr 29 '14 at 9:09

2 Answers 2

SSE2 is optimal when operating on completely parallel data. e.g.

for (int i = 0 ; i < N ; ++i)
    z[i] = _mm_xor_ps(x[i], y[i]);

But in your case, each iteration of the loop depends upon the output of the previous iteration. This is known as a dependency chain. In short, it means that each consecutive xor is going to have to wait for the entire latency of the previous one before it can continue so it lowers the throughput.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see your point. What is not optimal about waiting for the next iteration? How is it related to the parallelization? I compare with exactly the same scalar loop. Doesn't it have to wait the entire latency for the next iteration as well? –  klm123 Apr 29 '14 at 9:37
1  
The latency of the xor instruction is 1 cpu clock cycle whereas the latency of xorps is 4 clock cycles. –  jaket Apr 29 '14 at 9:43
1  
So he probably should unroll 4 times and have 4 aggregation values instead of one. No need to a result array. –  usr Apr 29 '14 at 9:47
    
@jaket, could you point me to some source of this information may be? So I can't understand it better. Thank you. –  klm123 Apr 29 '14 at 9:47
    
@usr, you mean 64 aggregation values instead of 16, which I have now? –  klm123 Apr 29 '14 at 9:48

jaket has already explained the likely problem: a dependency chain. I'll give it a try:

template<>
__m128 Sum(const __m128* data, const int N)
{
    __m128 sum1 = _mm_set_ps1(0);
    __m128 sum2 = _mm_set_ps1(0);
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i += 2) {
        sum1 = _mm_xor_ps(sum1, data[i + 0]);
        sum2 = _mm_xor_ps(sum2, data[i + 1]);
    }
    return _mm_xor_ps(sum1, sum2);
}

Now there are no dependencies at all between the two lanes. Try expanding this to more lanes (e.g. 4).

You could also try using the integer version of these instructions (using __m128i). I do not understand the difference so this is just a hint.

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