Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to make script for multiple input data files. What is the best way, how to handle that arguments? Usage of script should be:

./script.sh -a sth -b sth - c sth -d sth input1 input2 input3    

I can handle parameters and arguments using getopts, but I have no idea, how to handle these input files, because there is no flag for them. Thanks

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
while getopts ":a:b:c:d:" opt; do
  case "$opt" in
    a) i=$OPTARG ;;
    b) j=$OPTARG ;;
    c) k=$OPTARG ;;
    d) l=$OPTARG ;;
  esac
done
shift $(( OPTIND - 1 ))


for file in "$@"; do
  # your stuff here
done

Please try this, this may solve the purpose for you

My own comment has prompted me to extend the answer:

In case you want to do it only from getopts: You will have to call the script as

./script -a hj -b op -c zx -d some -f "File in list seperated with spaces"

while getopts ":a:b:c:d:f:" opt; do
  case "$opt" in
    a) i=$OPTARG ;;
    b) j=$OPTARG ;;
    c) k=$OPTARG ;;
    d) l=$OPTARG ;;
    f) files=$OPTARG ;;
  esac
done
                      #no shift is required now, since we have file list in $files
for file in $files; do
  # your stuff here
done
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I was looking for, thanks. Can I ask you to explain, how does it work? I understand that shift, but I don't know, how does that "for file cycle" works (how is it possible, it ignores other arguments and looks just for that last arguments)? –  Majzlik Apr 29 '14 at 9:23
    
No actually as per your question you were looking for handling everything from getopts, I have added an extra for loop :). For explaination part: read on shifting the cmdline arguments(shift $(( OPTIND - 1 ))), you will understand how $@ got only the desired files you ever wanted. –  PradyJord Apr 29 '14 at 9:26
    
I wouldn't recommend the second version, as it cannot deal with files with whitespace or certain other characters in their filenames. Let getopts handle the options, and leave the non-optional arguments in $@ for later processing. –  chepner Apr 29 '14 at 11:33
    
yeh but it can come handy when, script has two such params asking for a list like script -d some1 -f something -p "list of files" -j "list of files" –  PradyJord Apr 29 '14 at 11:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.