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I have a simple application whereby a UITableView is populated by a user tapping on an item in the UINavigationBar and then getting taken to another view to fill in UITextFields and UITextView. When the user clicks save, the information is saved to Core Data and then represented in this UITableView with the use of NSFetchedResultsController.

One of the attributes is a "Notes" attribute on a "Transaction" Entity. Filling in the Notes in the UITextView is completely optional, but if the user adds in a note, I want to show a custom image that I've created on the cell for the entry that has the note.

When the app is run in this version alone (so deleted and installed with this developer release), it works very well and the cells show the notes only for the cells that have the notes. However, when updating from a previous version of the app, this is where the problem occurs.

The previous version of the app didn't have a Notes attribute and so I used CoreData lightweight migration to set up a new model with a Notes attribute. That part works.

The Problem

Because of the reusing of cells, I'm noticing that when I've updated from an old version to this new version, none of the cells have the custom image and that's good because the notes doesn't exist. However, if I go in and add a new entry with a note and then scroll through my UITableView, I notice the cells start showing the custom image randomly, based on scrolling. So it disappears from one cell and shows up on another. This is a big mis-representation for my users and I'm not quite sure what to do to fix this.

In my cellForRow I have the following code:

self.pin = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(13, 30, 24, 25)];
self.pin.image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"pin"];
self.pin.tag = 777;
if (!transaction.notes) {
    dispatch_async (dispatch_get_main_queue (), ^{
        [[customCell viewWithTag:777] removeFromSuperview];
    });
}


if ([transaction.notes isEqualToString:@""] || ([transaction.notes isEqualToString:@" "] || ([transaction.notes isEqualToString:@"  "] || ([transaction.notes isEqualToString:@"   "]))))
{
    [[customCell viewWithTag:777] removeFromSuperview];
}
else
{
    [customCell addSubview:self.pin];        
}

So the first if statement is to check whether the notes exist and that returns true when updating from an old version of an app to this version. The second if statement just checks if the value of the notes is equal to a few spaces and if so, then to remove the note.

I just can't figure out what's going on here.

Possible Solution

In the same UITableView cell, I also have a green/red dot UIImageView which is displayed depending on whether the user selected a Given or Received Status when adding a new entry. With this in mind, one image is ALWAYS displayed, whether it's the green or red dot. So what I'm thinking about here is creating a transparent square and just changing the if statement to say "If note, show pin image and if not, show transparent image".

That feels a bit like a hack though and I'd prefer a proper way to fix this.

Any thoughts on this would really be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
I hope you know the cells are reused and therefore its essential to reset the cells before filling them. When i say reset you need to remove or set to default the items which are not constant. cellforrowatindexpath is the method where you would typically do this. –  Praveen S Apr 29 '14 at 10:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all, bad practice to allocate views in cellForRow. If you really need to allocate views in cellForRow do it just when it's needed, in your case in the else statement.

Second, do not use dispatch_async to dispatch on main thread if you are already on main thread (cellForRow it's on main thread).

The above points are just some suggestions for performance improvement.

As a solution of your problem, I would create a custom UITableViewCell and in it's method prepareForReuse I would remove the imageView.

EDIT

YourCustomCell.m

- (void)prepareForReuse {
   [super prepareForReuse];
   [[self viewWithTag:YOUR_TAG] removeFromSuperView];
}

This is a straightforward implementation, but you have to take in consideration that is more expensive to alloc/dealloc the UIImageView than keep a reference to the image and hide it when you don't need it. Something like:

YourCustomCell.h

@interface YourCustomCell : UITableViewCell {
  IBOutlet UIImageView *theImageView; // make sure you link the outlet properly ;)
}

YourCustomCell.m

 - (void)prepareForReuse {
       [super prepareForReuse];
       theImageView.hidden = YES;
    }

And in cellForRow you just have to check if you have notes and make the imageView visible (probably you will make theImageView a property)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much @danypata - that explanation makes a massive amount of sense and you have a great point there. I've removed the dispatch code. I should have made it clearer, sorry for that, I am actually already using a custom UITableViewCell for this UITableView's cells. I'm fairly unfamiliar and new to programming, so would you have an example of how I can utilise the prepareForReuse method in the custom UITableViewCell? Would I have to add a property for the UIImageView to that class and them remove it, or would I have to remove it with some condition? –  amitsbajaj Apr 29 '14 at 10:49
    
For example, would I use my if conditions in the prepareForReuse that I currently have in the cellForRow (all of them)? –  amitsbajaj Apr 29 '14 at 10:51
    
@Lavanya Check my edited answer ;) –  danypata Apr 29 '14 at 10:56
    
Dear @danypata - my apologies for the late reply but your edited answer did the trick completely. It not only got me to fix this issue, it got me understanding exactly what was going on. Massive thank you here! –  amitsbajaj Apr 29 '14 at 15:56
    
@Lavanya Glad I could help ;) –  danypata Apr 29 '14 at 15:58

Because table view cells are reused you must have a default value for your image. So for example set your image to transparent by default and change it under some condition. This will stop your image being shown in reused cells.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Panayot - that makes perfect sense and I'm setting the image to Transparent, but what I'm noticing now is, if I add an entry with a pin, the pin shows in the cell - that's all well and good, but if I remove the pin from that cell (editing the entry to remove the pin), when the UITableView appears again, it still shows the pin, until I refresh the view (by killing the app from the multi-tasking) - only then is it removed. In my viewWillAppear, I have the reloadData command.. so not sure why it's not updating straight away –  amitsbajaj Apr 29 '14 at 10:44
    
Move your data source array setup in viewwillappear as well if you uhave it in viewdidload. It is impotant to make all changes to your data source array first, and then call reloadData method. –  Pancho Apr 29 '14 at 10:50
    
Thanks @Panayot - it's using CoreData and NSFRC so I don't have any arrays in the viewDidLoad or viewWillAppear for the data source - that's being populated by the Core Data –  amitsbajaj Apr 29 '14 at 10:52
    
You should refresh your managed object after you make the changes to it then. Otherwise moc will hold you old object even if the object has been edited. Try [yourMOC refreshObject:yourObject mergeChanges:NO]; and then call reloadData –  Pancho Apr 29 '14 at 11:00

Why do you have a dispatch_async here?

if (!transaction.notes) {
    dispatch_async (dispatch_get_main_queue (), ^{
        [[customCell viewWithTag:777] removeFromSuperview];
    });
}

Because you cannot be sure when the function inside it will execute. Suppose that transaction.notes is nil. All the isEqualToString functions will return false and the else condition of addSubView will be called. But sometime after this function is exited the code inside dispatch_async will be run and remove the pin view. I'm not whether this is the intended behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Premsuraj - unfortunately this code was suggested to me by a fellow developer at some stage and with being new to programming, I didn't question it too much, but your explanation makes perfect sense as to why this is a bad idea to have this code. –  amitsbajaj Apr 29 '14 at 10:48

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