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After reading the mkdir(2) man page for the Unix system call with that name, it appears that the call doesn't create intermediate directories in a path, only the last directory in the path. Is there any way (or other function) to create all the directories in the path without resorting to manually parsing my directory string and individually creating each directory ?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 33 down vote accepted

There is not a system call to do it for you, unfortunately. I'm guessing that's because there isn't a way to have really well-defined semantics for what should happen in error cases. Should it leave the directories that have already been created? Delete them? What if the deletions fail? And so on...

It is pretty easy to roll your own, however, and a quick google for 'recursive mkdir' turned up a number of solutions. Here's one that was near the top:

http://nion.modprobe.de/blog/archives/357-Recursive-directory-creation.html

static void _mkdir(const char *dir) {
        char tmp[256];
        char *p = NULL;
        size_t len;

        snprintf(tmp, sizeof(tmp),"%s",dir);
        len = strlen(tmp);
        if(tmp[len - 1] == '/')
                tmp[len - 1] = 0;
        for(p = tmp + 1; *p; p++)
                if(*p == '/') {
                        *p = 0;
                        mkdir(tmp, S_IRWXU);
                        *p = '/';
                }
        mkdir(tmp, S_IRWXU);
}
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19  
Two years later, and a quick Google for 'recursive mkdir' lands you here. That's Stack Overflow for you. –  Dietrich Epp Aug 28 '12 at 8:12
5  
Nearly three years later, and I got a drive-by downvote. The link still seems valid, so at least that's good. –  Carl Norum Jan 22 '13 at 18:01
2  
I think most of my reputation points have come from the answer below, which helps if you searched recursive mkdir, but clearly isn't the right answer to the question. –  j03m Apr 24 at 15:47

hmm I thought that mkdir -p does that?

mkdir -p this/is/a/full/path/of/stuff

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1  
yes, it does. Thanks! –  Thomas Jones Dec 27 '12 at 21:37
17  
Yes it does, but the question pertains to a C function call. –  Craig McQueen Feb 19 '13 at 2:42
    
Indeed - the upvotes presumably reflect that this has been a useful answer for many, but it is an answer to a different question than the one which was asked. –  Chris Stratton Oct 7 at 18:20

Apparently not, my two suggestions are:

char dirpath[80] = "/path/to/some/directory";
sprintf(mkcmd, "mkdir -p %s", dirpath);
system(mkcmd);

Or if you don't want to use system() try looking at the coreutils mkdir source code and see how they implemented the -p option.

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I pretty much can't use the system command because I'm using a severely impaired (even for busybox) version of busybox. I can't assume that any command has all the standard arguments, or is even installed for that matter, because I'm working on an embedded system. I went with Carl Norum's answer because it works the best in my specific scenario, but your answer was good as well. –  Alex Marshall Feb 25 '10 at 19:38
    
OMG - it's 2014, file paths have usually spaces now. Please don't code like this –  Lothar Apr 29 at 22:28
1  
@Lothar Perhaps you didn't realize that this answer was made more than 4 years ago, so OMG - it's 2010 would be more apt. Perhaps it's just me, but a lack of quotes around %s hardly seems appropriate to bring a deity into the mix. If you'd like to suggest the edit, please feel free to do so. –  SiegeX Apr 30 at 6:27
    
@Lothar There's also the bad choice to use system() for this in the first place, the security flaw from not using an absolute path to mkdir, and the incorrectly coded 'char dirpath[]' line; every line has something wrong with it so had to downvote it; sorry SiegeX, but this was a really bad answer, but as you said, it was in 2010 ;) –  Nick Aug 27 at 17:49
1  
/bin/sh will use the PATH environment variable to locate mkdir. If an executable called mkdir is in a path location before /bin, that will be executed instead. –  Nick Aug 28 at 9:53

Take a look at the bash source code here, and specifically look in examples/loadables/mkdir.c especially lines 136-210. If you don't want to do that, here's some of the source that deals with this (taken straight from the tar.gz that I've linked):

/* Make all the directories leading up to PATH, then create PATH.  Note that
   this changes the process's umask; make sure that all paths leading to a
   return reset it to ORIGINAL_UMASK */

static int
make_path (path, nmode, parent_mode)
     char *path;
     int nmode, parent_mode;
{
  int oumask;
  struct stat sb;
  char *p, *npath;

  if (stat (path, &sb) == 0)
  {
      if (S_ISDIR (sb.st_mode) == 0)
      {
          builtin_error ("`%s': file exists but is not a directory", path);
          return 1;
      }

      if (chmod (path, nmode))
      {
          builtin_error ("%s: %s", path, strerror (errno));
          return 1;
      }

      return 0;
  }

  oumask = umask (0);
  npath = savestring (path);    /* So we can write to it. */

  /* Check whether or not we need to do anything with intermediate dirs. */

  /* Skip leading slashes. */
  p = npath;
  while (*p == '/')
    p++;

  while (p = strchr (p, '/'))
  {
      *p = '\0';
      if (stat (npath, &sb) != 0)
      {
          if (mkdir (npath, parent_mode))
          {
              builtin_error ("cannot create directory `%s': %s", npath, strerror (errno));
              umask (original_umask);
              free (npath);
              return 1;
          }
      }
      else if (S_ISDIR (sb.st_mode) == 0)
      {
          builtin_error ("`%s': file exists but is not a directory", npath);
          umask (original_umask);
          free (npath);
          return 1;
      }

      *p++ = '/';   /* restore slash */
      while (*p == '/')
          p++;
  }

  /* Create the final directory component. */
  if (stat (npath, &sb) && mkdir (npath, nmode))
  {
      builtin_error ("cannot create directory `%s': %s", npath, strerror (errno));
      umask (original_umask);
      free (npath);
      return 1;
  }

  umask (original_umask);
  free (npath);
  return 0;
}

You can probably get away with a less general implementation.

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Actually you can just use:

mkdir -p ./some/directories/to/be/created/
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1  
Yes you can, but the question pertains to a C function call. –  Craig McQueen Feb 4 at 2:47

Here is my solution. By calling the function below you ensure that all dirs leading to the file path specified exist. Note that file_path argument is not directory name here but rather a path to a file that you are going to create after calling mkpath().

Eg., mkpath("/home/me/dir/subdir/file.dat", 0755) shall create /home/me/dir/subdir if it does not exist. mkpath("/home/me/dir/subdir/", 0755) does the same.

Works with relative paths as well.

Returns -1 and sets errno in case of an error.

int mkpath(char* file_path, mode_t mode) {
  assert(file_path && *file_path);
  char* p;
  for (p=strchr(file_path+1, '/'); p; p=strchr(p+1, '/')) {
    *p='\0';
    if (mkdir(file_path, mode)==-1) {
      if (errno!=EEXIST) { *p='/'; return -1; }
    }
    *p='/';
  }
  return 0;
}

Note that file_path is modified during the action but gets restored afterwards. Therefore file_path is not strictly const.

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Thanks a lot, your effort saved my time...... –  Piyuesh Apr 2 '13 at 7:08

Here's another take on mkpath(), using recursion, which is both small and readable. It makes use of strdupa() to avoid altering the given dir string argument directly and to avoid using malloc() & free(). Make sure to compile with -D_GNU_SOURCE to activate strdupa() ... meaning this code only works on GLIBC, EGLIBC, uClibc, and other GLIBC compatible C libraries.

int mkpath(char *dir, mode_t mode)
{
    if (!dir) {
        errno = EINVAL;
        return 1;
    }

    if (strlen(dir) == 1 && dir[0] == '/')
        return 0;

    mkpath(dirname(strdupa(dir)), mode);

    return mkdir(dir, mode);
}
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Wouldn't this leak memory every time strdupa is called? –  nemo Dec 17 '13 at 13:09
    
Nope :) When the function goes out of context the memory allocated (on the stack) by strdupa() is freed automatically. See the man page for more details. –  troglobit Dec 19 '13 at 19:17
    
Ah, sorry, you're right. I thought of strdup all the time. :) –  nemo Dec 19 '13 at 23:12

The two other answers given are for mkdir(1) and not mkdir(2) like you ask for, but you can look at the source code for that program and see how it implements the -p options which calls mkdir(2) repeatedly as needed.

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The actual question was "Is there any way (or other function) to create all the directories in the path without resorting to manually parsing my directory string and individually creating each directory " so mkdir(1) is another way! –  Jarrod Roberson Feb 25 '10 at 17:58
    
Where can we find the make_dir_parents() function? That's probably the most interesting bit, but not in that file. –  Craig McQueen Feb 19 '13 at 22:39

My recursive way of doing this:

static void recursive_mkdir(char *path, mode_t mode)
{
    char *spath = strdup(path);
    char *next_dir = dirname(spath);

    if (access(next_dir, F_OK) == 0)
    {
        goto done;
    }

    if (strcmp(next_dir, ".") == 0 || strcmp(next_dir, "/") == 0)
    {
        goto done;
    }

    recursive_mkdir(next_dir, mode);
    mkdir(next_dir, mode);

done:
    free(spath);
    return;
}
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Using goto's really? –  Jeff Aug 17 '13 at 19:26
3  
@Jeff, Yup. Any problem with that? In this case looks easier to understand than plenty of ifs or something like that. It's readable and works well. –  Kamiccolo Sep 10 '13 at 22:36

My solution:

int mkrdir(const char *path, int index, int permission)
{
    char bf[NAME_MAX];
    if(*path == '/')
        index++;
    char *p = strchr(path + index, '/');
    int len;
    if(p) {
        len = MIN(p-path, sizeof(bf)-1);
        strncpy(bf, path, len);
        bf[len]=0;
    } else {
        len = MIN(strlen(path)+1, sizeof(bf)-1);
        strncpy(bf, path, len);
        bf[len]=0;
    }

    if(access(bf, 0)!=0) {
        mkdir(bf, permission);
        if(access(bf, 0)!=0) {
            return -1;
        }
    }
    if(p) {
        return mkrdir(path, p-path+1, permission);
    }
    return 0;
}
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