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I want to produce such file (cartesian product of [1-3]X[1-5] ) :

1 1
1 2
1 3
1 4
1 5
2 1
2 2
2 3
2 4
2 5
3 1
3 2
3 3
3 4
3 5

I can do this using nested loop like:

for i in $(seq 3) 
do
  for j in $(seq 5)
  do
      echo $i $j
  done
done

is there any solution without using loops?

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can use this:

$ printf "%s\n" {1..3}" "{1..5}
1 1
1 2
1 3
1 4
1 5
2 1
2 2
2 3
2 4
2 5
3 1
3 2
3 3
3 4
3 5

Which uses the brace expansion:

$ echo {1..5}
1 2 3 4 5

and its combination:

$ echo {1..5}+{a,b,c}
1+a 1+b 1+c 2+a 2+b 2+c 3+a 3+b 3+c 4+a 4+b 4+c 5+a 5+b 5+c
share|improve this answer
    
does {1..3} expand by shell? – Taher Khorshidi Apr 29 '14 at 11:14
    
Yes, {1..3} is same as seq 3 or seq 1 3, just that it comes with shell. – fedorqui Apr 29 '14 at 11:14
    
is there any other using paste? – Taher Khorshidi Apr 29 '14 at 11:19
2  
Not that I know, and I don't see the need. You can maybe use echo {1..3}" "{1..5} | xargs -n 2. – fedorqui Apr 29 '14 at 11:22

The best alternative for cartesian product in bash is surely -- as pointed by @fedorqui -- to use parameter expansion. However, in case your input that is not easily producible (i.e., if {1..3} and {1..5} does not suffice), you could simply use join.

For example, if you want to peform the cartesian product of two regular files, say "a.txt" and "b.txt", you could do the following. First, the two files:

$ echo -en {a..c}"\tx\n" | sed 's/^/1\t/' > a.txt
$ cat a.txt
1    a    x
1    b    x
1    c    x

$ echo -en "foo\nbar\n" | sed 's/^/1\t/' > b.txt
$ cat b.txt
1    foo
1    bar

Notice the sed command is used to prepend each line with an identifier. The identifier must be the same for all lines, and for all files, so the join will give you the cartesian product -- instead of putting aside some of the resultant lines. So, the join goes as follows:

$ join -j 1 -t $'\t' a.txt b.txt | cut -d $'\t' -f 2-
a    x    foo
a    x    bar
b    x    foo
b    x    bar
c    x    foo
c    x    bar

After both files are joined, cut is used as an alternative to remove the column of "1"s formerly prepended.

share|improve this answer
    
what u write as join is really a join (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…) i do not need join. what i want is cartesian product (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cartesian_product). – Taher Khorshidi Apr 29 '14 at 12:35
1  
@طاهر Well, when you join each and every row from one table with the rows from another table, i.e., when you do a cross join, your output is a cartesian product. – Rubens Apr 29 '14 at 12:40
1  
The benefit of this solution is that bash doesn't inherently allow variables to be used in brace expansions. You can use variables in brace expansion with eval, but then you're using eval. – Erik Jul 22 '15 at 5:26

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