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I have a directory structure that looks like this:

/a/f.xml
/b/f.xml
/c/f.xml
/d/f.xml

What I want to do is copy all the xml files into one directory like this:

/e/f_0.xml
/e/f_1.xml
/e/f_2.xml
/e/f_3.xml

How can I do that efficiently on the Linux shell?

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1  
Do you want to always append a number, or only if the filenames would otherwise collide? Are you committed to a shell script, or is a Perl, Python, or similar scripting language acceptable? (If not, is bash fine or only POSIX sh?) –  Roger Pate Feb 25 '10 at 18:07
    
Sorry, should have clarified this more: Every subdirectory contains the same filenames, so yes, the number should be appended to every file. I hoped for a pure shell script solution, but id needn't be POSIX only, so bash would be fine, too. –  Florian Feb 25 '10 at 18:17
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
let count=0
for file in $(ls $dir)
do
mv $file $newdir/${file%%.*}_$count.${file##*.}
let count=count+1
done
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@ennuikiller: that's a cool one...shouldnt that ls be recursive to pick out the *.xml...?? +1 from me :D –  t0mm13b Feb 25 '10 at 18:22
    
why not use something like find $dir -type f -name "*.xml" in place of ls $dir? –  jschmier Feb 25 '10 at 18:34
    
Don't use ls and you shouldn't use for either. Pipe find into while. Also, this doesn't recurse into the source directories and it picks up all the files rather than just the xml files. –  Dennis Williamson Feb 25 '10 at 18:38
    
@dennis,@jschier "Every subdirectory contains the same filenames, so yes, the number should be appended to every file" - op and yes while in general is preferred because it deals with spaces in filenames, but it is not necessary in this case –  ennuikiller Feb 25 '10 at 19:03
    
-1 for useless use of ls. use shell expansion –  ghostdog74 Feb 26 '10 at 0:38
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#!/bin/bash
COUNTER=0;
for i in */f.xml;
do
    BASE=`expr "$i" : '.*/\(.*\)\..*'`;
    EXT=`expr "$i" : '.*/.*\.\(.*\)'`;
    mv "$i" e/"$BASE"_"$COUNTER"."$EXT";
    COUNTER=`expr $COUNTER + 1`
done;
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#!/bin/bash
for file in /{a,b,c,d}/f.xml
do
    name=${file##*/}
    name=${name%.xml}
    ((i++))
    echo mv "$file" "/destination/${name}_${i}.xml"
done

bash 4.0 (for recursive)

shopt -s globstar
for file in /path/**/f.xml
do
    name=${file##*/}
    name=${name%.xml}
    ((i++))
    echo mv "$file" "/destination/${name}_${i}.xml"
done
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