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I am starting a project with Grails since I already use Eclipse, it was my first choice. But I don´t think its good enough, had some problems and the plugging is poor in functionalities.

Anyone uses/tested others IDEs(NetBeans, InteliJ(not free)...)?

Which one is the best?

thanks.

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closed as not constructive by Bill the Lizard Sep 3 '11 at 23:15

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It seems pretty clear that IntelliJ is the best option. What's the best freebie editor/plugin combination? –  Brandon Feb 3 '10 at 12:18
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The most well-respected answers are easily two years old, I wonder if anything's changed by now...? –  Tomer Gabel Feb 14 '11 at 23:36
    
The landscape has changed substantially since this question was asked. The NetBeans plugin for grails is no longer under active development. Both STS and IntelliJ have made big improvements in their support. –  Andrew Eisenberg Mar 27 '11 at 21:23
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16 Answers

I switched to IntelliJ for its excellent (better than Eclipse & Netbeans at the time) Groovy and Grails support.

For an overview of Groovy and Grails related features of IntelliJ have a look here.

Update: a free and open source community edition of IntelliJ is now available here. The free version includes all Groovy features. The Grails features are only available in the Ultimate edition.

Since release 9.0.2 support for custom Groovy DSLs is available. Sure hope that more Groovy library providers will bundle gdsl definitions, like GPars already does.

New features and improvements in IntelliJ X:

  • Groovy++ support
  • Improved code completion in GSP's (for model returned from controller, inline variables defined with g:set or g:each, controller name and actions, ... )
  • Grails domain classes: support for the mapping DSL and the constraint DSL
  • Grails queries: support for named queries and the criteria DSL
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unfortunate for those indie developers or hobbyists who cannot afford the rather steep licensing costs for intellij. But it is the best out there, and perhaps jetbrain does deserve the money. –  Chii Oct 29 '08 at 9:55
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Steep? Well, expensive compared to Eclipse, but much cheaper than commercial Java IDEs were around the year 2000 –  Steve McLeod Nov 12 '08 at 10:28
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And in the mean time an open source Community edition of IntelliJ is available. The Groovy features are included in this free edition, the Grails features are only available in the Ultimate edition. –  Ruben Oct 27 '09 at 8:20
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249 USD for a full-featured IDE is not a bad deal. 99 USD for academics. –  cliff.meyers Dec 24 '09 at 16:00
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@cliff 99 USD is quite a number down here. Not unreachable, but still, it will make you think twice. –  Tom Sep 27 '10 at 2:59
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I like the Spring's Eclipse Version: STS (http://www.springsource.com/products/sts), install the latest Groovy and Grails plugins and it works well.

I use eclipse for Java so i find it much more natural to use than IntelliJ.

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I'm using STS today and his highlights and autocomplete is buggy. –  Topera May 30 '11 at 10:08
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Netbeans 6.5 has Groovy/Grails support (code completion, etc.) baked in, and it's free. IntelliJ is arguably better but it costs you.

I've used both and I'd say they are about equivalent (obviously some small differences), so give Netbeans a shot. If not, buy IntelliJ.

http://www.netbeans.org

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I have to say, the Groovy/Grails support in IntelliJ is brilliant. –  Hates_ Oct 24 '08 at 21:31
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A lot of things about IntelliJ are brilliant. Both IDEs have their quirks, and for the moment I like Netbeans, but I tend to switch back and forth. –  Eric Wendelin Oct 24 '08 at 22:57
    
I switched from Eclipse to IntelliJ end of last year while I was first playing around with Groovy & Grails, and my feeling is that it was an enabler for Groovy. At least for an IDE habitué like myself. My last experience with Netbeans was back in 2004, so I have no profounded opinion on Netbeans. –  Ruben Oct 27 '08 at 23:49
    
I think both Netbeans and Eclipse do great at standard Groovy support...Netbeans edges out eclipse for grails but not everything is supported and thus has to be completed using the command line interface. –  Eric Warriner Aug 31 '10 at 18:06
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You say, "I am starting a project." Is that project open source or proprietary? If it's open source, it might be eligible for a free IntelliJ license from JetBrains. I don't know if your project would qualify, but you should at least check it out.

I've done some work with Groovy/Grails in IntelliJ and have been really happy with it.

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Actually, Eclipse really has worked great for me and seems to be the best free solution. IntelliJ is far too expensive for being only slightly better than Eclipse (if even that).

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I tried Netbeans, is much, much better than Eclipse. –  fernandogarcez Oct 27 '08 at 17:55
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If you don't want to spend money, try Netbeans 6.5. The two main advantages over Eclipse are the categorized project view (split up in Domain Classes, Controllers, Views etc.) and some Grails commands built-in in the context menu (such as "generate-all"). In my experience, the code completion in GSP is hit-and-miss - it sometimes works, it sometimes doesn't. On the downside, Netbeans is dog-slow at times (mark two lines, indent them with [Tab] and wait two seconds for the lines to shift) and has the really annoying feature to scan all your projects at start-up.

If you go for Netbeans, download the Java version and then add Groovy & Grails. You can remove a lot of the default plugins for increased speed.

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Spending time dealing with IDEs that are not mature for Grails, could COST YOU MORE than buying a license to JetBrains and its excellent product: IntelliJ IDEA.

I think STS will rule them all, but just passed one year since I started with Grails and it's not that good yet.

Maybe one more year... 'Til that, I'm going very productive with IDEA =)

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I took advantage of InteliJ's free trial and I did like it, but not enough to pay for it. I am using NetBeans 6.5 and it works well. If cost didn't matter I might choose IntelliJ but there is no compelling feature that makes me say that. One thing I did not try in IntelliJ was application server integration. NetBeans integrates extremely well with GlassFish but you do have to install GlassFish locally in order to use it with remote servers.

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I use IntelliJ myself and it has an excellent Groovy/Grails support but if you do not want to spend money on it then give NetBeans 6.5 a try See here for how to integrate grails with NetBeans

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I have tried out both Eclipse (STS 2.2.0) and Netbeans (6.7.1) for grails development. Feature-wise Netbeans looks richer. Netbeans provides decent support for code completion of dynamic finders. However, it has no support for GSP code completion. GSP code completion feature is planned for Netbeans 6.8 release. Hope it makes it. The Spring Tools Suite apparently looked very promising when I read about it but it was quite a disappointment. It provides support for a grails project creation and provides a window inside Eclipse (STS is Eclipse with the Spring Tools) to fire grails command. No support is available for contextual code completion in either gsp or grails specific groovy code. However, the groovy eclipse plugin is quite powerful. So, right now I have personally reverted to using a text editor and the grails command line. Will have to wait till decent contextual code completion support is available. I have not yet tried intellij idea.

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Same deal, new to Grails and checking out IDEs.

Eclipse and STS are mediocre for Groovy/Grails at this point, although in future, since STS owns Grails, STS should get up-to-speed. Netbeans 6.8 looks great, the perfect fit, and free, but code completion is absurdly slow on OSX.

I'd go with IntelliJ, not free, but $250 is worth it, decent code completion alone is worth the price tag.

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You should give STS another try : the latest Milestone version has a cool Grails perspective that looks preety much like IntelliJ's... –  Philippe Aug 22 '10 at 19:14
    
I will do that, I've switched to Linux workstation and Intellij code completion is less than impressive (the number must-have for me in an IDE). –  virtualeyes Oct 14 '10 at 16:31
    
Netbeans 6.9.1, Groovy code completion utterly painful. STS came out with 2.5 RC1 today. Downloaded, installed, magic, the search is indeed over ;--) STS's latest release is impressive, awesome, snappy code completion (ctrl-space and alt-/ are clearly gifts from above) and easy-to-navigate interface for Groovy/Grails devel. Much relieved... –  virtualeyes Oct 15 '10 at 22:17
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I'm used to STS for springframework/roo based development; i'm quite disappointed on STS's refactoring (!) and code formatting for groovy/grails.

Example:

  1. create a new grails project
  2. install springsecurity-core plugin
  3. move or rename User/Role classes
  4. bang! class references in ConfigGroovy have not been recognised:

    // Added by the Spring Security Core plugin: grails.plugins.springsecurity.userLookup.userDomainClassName = 'User' grails.plugins.springsecurity.userLookup.authorityJoinClassName = 'UserRole' grails.plugins.springsecurity.authority.className = 'Role'

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STS is my choice at the moment. Tried Netbeans, but prefer STS, much better support for code completion. Haven't tried IntelliJ, but have heard that it is on a similar level of usefulness as STS, if not better.

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I use IntelliJ 9 Ultimate at work and do work with grails. I've tried STS and Eclipse, and hands down IntelliJ's support is the best. It makes it so much easier to figure out where everything is and how to connect it. Lots of Grails-specific buttons and icons to help point out where things are, such as the toolbar that lets you switch between the views, controller and domain class of any of your objects, as well as tying actions to the different classes like generating GSPs for you domain or generating a controller.

It really makes the rapid development that much faster. It also has great support for Grails plugins (auto-complete picks up new things like taglib and domain/properties from the plugins)

That said, it's a shame GRAILS isn't included in the open source version. I would love to toy around with GRAILS in my free time as It's an awesome platform.

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I have used Intellij and Eclipse for Grails development. I find IntelliJ better for grails (although I generally use Eclipse for most development, including Rails). IntelliJ seems more cohesive - easier to set things up and connect things together. It also seems to have better support for Groovy, which is extremely helpful.

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I use netbeans and STS for me STS is better .

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