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background: The view is called when a payment service pings back a payment outcome behind the scenes - afterwhich I need to send an email in the right language to confirm payment and so on. I can get the language code back in the request from the payment server and would like to use that along with Django's i18n systems to determine which language to send my email out in.

So I need to set the language of my django app from within a view. And then do my template rendering and emailing all in one go.

setting request.session['django_language'] = lang only effects the next view when I'm testing.

Is there any other way to do it?

Cheers,

Guy

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4 Answers 4

up vote 40 down vote accepted

To quote parts from Django's Locale Middleware (django.middleware.locale.LocaleMiddleware):

from django.utils import translation

class LocaleMiddleware(object):
    """
    This is a very simple middleware that parses a request
    and decides what translation object to install in the current
    thread context. This allows pages to be dynamically
    translated to the language the user desires (if the language
    is available, of course).
    """

    def process_request(self, request):
        language = translation.get_language_from_request(request)
        translation.activate(language)
        request.LANGUAGE_CODE = translation.get_language()

The translation.activate(language) is the important bit.

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Great hint. Helped me solve a quite unrelated problem I had (where a doctest was failing because some prior tests used django's test client, that left the system with an unexpected value of locale. Adding translation.deactivate_all() at the start of the doctest fixed the issue) –  Carles Barrobés Jun 10 '11 at 11:27
    
How can I use it, to set language during logging user in my custom view? Language code is place in UserProfile table. –  robos85 Jun 21 '11 at 19:38
11  
Warning, I just fixed a bug in a current development, due to translation.activate : threads are reused between requests and keep the last language activated. This lead to weird stuff like django admin switching language all the time. If you manually trigger transaction.activate, don't forget to use translation.deactivate after all strings have been rendered ( that's what LocaleMiddleware does after the rendering ). –  vincent Mar 21 '12 at 9:08
1  
Be sure to place LocaleMiddleware after SessionMiddleware, we just solved some problems that were due to that. –  littlegreen Dec 11 '13 at 10:36

request.LANGUAGE_CODE if LocaleMiddleware activated

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Sometimes you want to enforce a certain language for a given view but let the browser language settings choice the language for the rest of the views. I haven't figured out how to change the language in the view code but you can do this by implementing a simple Middleware

lang_based_on_url_middleware.py:

from django.utils import translation

# Dictionary of urls that should use special language regardless of language set in browser
#   key = url
#   val = language code
special_cases = {
    '/this/is/some/url/' : 'dk',
    '/his/is/another/special/case' : 'de',
                 }

class LangBasedOnUrlMiddleware(object):
    def process_request(self, request):
        if request.path_info in special_cases:
            lang = special_cases[request.path_info]
            translation.activate(lang)
            request.LANGUAGE_CODE = lang

In settings.py:

MIDDLEWARE_CLASSES = (
    ...
    'django.middleware.locale.LocaleMiddleware',
    'inner.lang_based_on_url_middleware.LangBasedOnUrlMiddleware', # remember that the order of LocaleMiddleware and LangBasedOnUrlMiddleware matters
    ...
)

Not an elegant solution but it works.

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Be sure to also add deactivate in process_response, otherwise you will have problems with different threads.

from django.utils import translation

class LocaleMiddleware(object):
    """
    This is a very simple middleware that parses a request
    and decides what translation object to install in the current
    thread context. This allows pages to be dynamically
    translated to the language the user desires (if the language
    is available, of course).
    """

    def process_request(self, request):
        language = translation.get_language_from_request(request)
        translation.activate(language)
        request.LANGUAGE_CODE = translation.get_language()

    def process_response(self, request, response):
        translation.deactivate()
        return response
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As I experienced a strange behavior using the middleware without deactivating translation, I wonder why this creates problems with threads. Anyhow, thanks for the important hint. +1 –  Thomas Kremmel Mar 27 '13 at 22:41

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