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I have a dataset in time series (an observation per day). What I would like to do is find the number of days until an observation is above zero for each day in the dataset.

A sample of the dataset looks like this:

Date        Runoff
01/01/1980  0
02/01/1980  0
03/01/1980  0
04/01/1980  0
05/01/1980  4.5
06/01/1980  2
07/01/1980  0
08/01/1980  0
09/01/1980  0
10/01/1980  0
11/01/1980  0
12/01/1980  0
13/01/1980  1.2
14/01/1980  0 
15/01/1980  0
16/01/1980  0
17/01/1980  0
18/01/1980  0.8

And what I would like to get to is this:

Date        Runoff   No_Days
01/01/1980  0        4
02/01/1980  0        3
03/01/1980  0        2
04/01/1980  0        1
05/01/1980  4.5      0
06/01/1980  2        0
07/01/1980  0        6
08/01/1980  0        5
09/01/1980  0        4
10/01/1980  0        3
11/01/1980  0        2
12/01/1980  0        1  
13/01/1980  1.2      0
14/01/1980  0        4      
15/01/1980  0        3
16/01/1980  0        2
17/01/1980  0        1
18/01/1980  0.8      0

So as you can see if there is runoff on a particular date then there are 0 days until runoff, if there is a runoff event the next day then there is 1 day until runoff etc.

I've been using R for a while and this is the first time I haven't been able to find a solution hence this is my first R related question on here so please go easy on me!

If I've missed anything don't hesitate to let it be known.

Thank you,

J

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1  
What do you want to happen if the data ends with a sequence of zeros, if there is no non-zero value to count down to? You should also check your sample data; Runoff for 18/01/1980 differs between the two data sets –  Henrik Apr 29 '14 at 15:33
    
Yes I noticed that too, but I think my solution is general enough. –  infominer Apr 29 '14 at 15:35
    
My apologies, this isn't my actual data just an example so that's a typo. It's been amended now. The dataset is 30 years in total, but you're right I'll have to account for when the last runoff day is. –  Catchment_Jack Apr 29 '14 at 15:39
    
@Catchment_Jack tested my code with last day having runoff and runoff being=0. It works in both cases. –  infominer Apr 29 '14 at 15:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I was also thinking of rle and seq_len:

df$No_Days <- unlist(sapply(rle(df$Runoff)$lengths, 
                            function(x) 
                              if (x>1) 
                                rev(seq_len(x)) 
                              else 0))
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This works a treat. Thank you! –  Catchment_Jack Apr 29 '14 at 15:44
    
As an added extra how do you think the above code could be modified if I wanted to change the runoff threshold i.e. instead of 0 it was 0.05 for example? Thanks! –  Catchment_Jack Apr 30 '14 at 7:29
    
@Catchment_Jack Hm I don't know if I understand you correctly. Maybe creating a new column, say Runoff2, which zeroes out values <= the threshold, then running the code on this column? –  lukeA Apr 30 '14 at 8:04
    
Thanks that little hack works well. –  Catchment_Jack Apr 30 '14 at 8:13

Here's a more R way. I am using rle and a bit of hack

dates.df$No_Days <-unlist(lapply(rle(dates.df$Runoff)$lengths,function(x) rev(seq(x:1))))
#now the hackish part. For those runoffs that are greater than zero
dates.df$No_Days <-ifelse(dates.df$Runoff>0,0,dates.df$No_Days)
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Thanks for the answer infominer. This method works as well but I've given the tick to lukeA as it's little more elegant. I wish I could give a tick to both! –  Catchment_Jack Apr 29 '14 at 15:46
    
Yup it is more elegant, I like to be a little more explicit in my code. though I concur the use of seq_len was a masterstroke –  infominer Apr 29 '14 at 15:47

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