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I have a function with some variable arguments params, and I need to call inside it another function passing this arguments. For example, someone call this function:

bool A(const char* format, ...)
{
  //some work here...
  bool res = B(format, /*other params*/);
  return res;
}

bool B(const char* format, /**/, ...)
{
   va_list arg;
   va_start(arg, format);
   //other work here...
}

I need to know, how to pass the variable params by the ellipse received by A to B function. Thanks

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marked as duplicate by Paul Roub, ajay, Sergey L., Deduplicator, Cheers and hth. - Alf Apr 29 at 17:28

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You cannot do that directly, so you need to follow the same pattern that C library follows with fprintf / vfprintf groups of functions.

The idea is to put the implementation into the v-prefixed function, and use the user-facing function with no v prefix to "unwrap" the va_list before calling the real implementation.

bool A(const char* format, ...)
{
  //some work here...
   va_list arg;
   va_start(arg, format);
   bool res = vB(format, arg);
   va_end(arg);
   return res;
}

bool B(const char* format, /**/, ...)
{
   va_list arg;
   va_start(arg, format);
   bool res = vB(format, arg);
   va_end(arg);
   return res;
}

bool vB(const char* format, va_list arg) {
    // real work here...
}
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GCC has an extension doing that though. –  Deduplicator Apr 29 at 17:21
3  
@Deduplicator It is best to program to the language free of extensions for maximum portability. –  dasblinkenlight Apr 29 at 17:22
    
I concurr, just mentioning it for completeness. –  Deduplicator Apr 29 at 17:33
    
thanks @dasblinkenlight, it worked doing so. :) –  yosoy Apr 29 at 18:07

It is not possible to pass them in the usual notation the only thing that is possible is to forward variable arguments to a function that accepts a va_list. Example for forwarding arguments to vprintf (the va_list version of printf):

int printf(const char * restrict format, ...) {
  va_list arg;
  va_start(arg, format);
  int ret = vprintf(format, arg);
  va_end(args);
  return ret;
}
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So, there is not possible way, just doing another function... –  yosoy Apr 29 at 18:10

There you go:

bool A(const char* format,...)
{
    bool res;
    va_list args;
    va_start(args,format);
    res = B(format,args);
    va_end(args);
    return res;
}
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1  
in that case, B() must be bool B( const char *, va_list ); instead of bool B( const char *, ... ); –  Ingo Leonhardt Apr 29 at 17:23
    
@Ingo Leonhardt: So according to what you're saying, printf also takes const char *, va_list instead of const char *, ..., which is not correct to the best of my knowledge. Are you sure about this? –  barak manos Apr 29 at 17:26
2  
yout couldn't (portably) call printf() like that, but you had to use vprintf() instead, which indeed is int vprintf( const char *, va_list );. Look at @Sergey L.'s answer –  Ingo Leonhardt Apr 29 at 17:29

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