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When using locks, do I need to lock around my get? From my testing I do not need to do so, but I wanted to make sure. Also, how do I format the code I posted so it has the proper schema colors? It is asking me to add more details, but I don't really know what to add- I am moreover asking (from someone more experienced than I) if what I have is correct and will work without throwing cross thread exceptions.

class exam
{
    private static readonly exam x = new exam();
    private static readonly object lckobj = new object();

    private int i;
    private int _count;

    private exam() { }

    public static exam AccessPoint
    {
        get
        {
            return x;
        }
    }

    public int myInt
    {
        get
        {
            return i;
        }
        set
        {
            lock(lckobj)
            {
                i = value;
            }
        }
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get
        {
            return _count;
        }
        set
        {
            lock(lckobj)
            {
                _count = value;
            }
        }
    }

}

class myDemo
{
    Random r = new Random();
    bool b = false;
    Thread[] t = new Thread[3];

    public myDemo()
    {
        for(int i=0; i < 3; i++)
        {
            t[i] = new Thread(new ThreadStart(thread1));
            t[i].Start();
        }

        Thread checks = new Thread(new ThreadStart(checkB));
        checks.Start();

    }

    void checkB()
    {
        var x = exam.AccessPoint;
        while (!b)
        {
            b = (x.Count >= 10) ? true : false;
            Console.WriteLine("\tb:{0}\tCount:{1}", b, x.Count);
            Thread.Sleep(100);
        }
    }

    void thread1()
    {
        var x = exam.AccessPoint;

        while (!b)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(r.Next(500, 1000));

            x.myInt = r.Next(1, 10);
            x.Count = x.Count + 1;
            Console.WriteLine(x.myInt);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
yes sorry C#- I never know whether or not to add tag of C# –  alykins Apr 29 at 18:33
    
@EricLippert has a great read on the subject. He looks at the question "Should i lock when only reading an int" ericlippert.com/2014/03/12/… –  Yuval Itzchakov Apr 29 at 20:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Even if you added the lock around the get your code still wouldn't work properly, although there are more possible things that can go wrong if you don't do that.

The following line is problematic in a way that cannot be fixed by locking in Count:

x.Count = x.Count + 1;

Here even if you add locks, it's entirely possible for one thread to read a value, stop before updating, then have another thread read the value, increment the count, and then write it back. That write will be overridden when the first thread continues on. No amount of locking in Count will change that.

Of course, without the lock in Count there is no memory barrier introduced, so reads to that value are allowed to be reading stale values, which can further exacerbate the previous problem.

share|improve this answer
    
the above code is an example of different code that will not normally have that issue- I'm not asking for a logic check as in will it stop correctly where it is supposed to- I am curious as to whether or not I need locks around my get to ensure thread safety the real code is thousands of lines and multiple classes- I just need to know if I have multiple threads accessing a get on my static class if it will throw cross thread exception- the above code works without any of those errors so I think it is okay, but wanted verification. –  alykins Apr 29 at 18:37
    
@user3198872 Thread safety is a function of an entire program, not individual operations. A sequence of individually atomic operations can be combined in ways that make the entire program not function as would be desired. Without knowing how a given method is going to be used one cannot analyze if it is sufficently "safe" for the purposes of its callers. See this blog article for further information. Here's another article if you're interested. –  Servy Apr 29 at 18:40
    
I feel everyone is getting hung up on the count logic- that does not matter- it was simply a way for me to build in a dead-kill so my void threads did not go on for an infinite amount of time. –  alykins Apr 29 at 19:09
    
@user3198872 But it does matter. It is of the utmost importance. Your claim that it is irrelevant is false. How you plan to use this type is essential to how it should be implemented. If you want to know if an implementation should be performed, we need to know what you plan to do with it. –  Servy Apr 29 at 19:11
    
Sorry I had to add another comment due to length... I also read article 2 you linked and it makes things more confusing- I understand what it's saying about locking around the get in that it cannot read before/after the lock was imposed, but what about if the set is locked? If the property is being read via an unlocked get, then how can a set with a lock impose a lock around that object? or would that right there be the cross talk exception? and if so- why when I run the above code do I not get any exceptions? –  alykins Apr 29 at 19:15

Reading a value of a variable by multiple threads in the same time is safe.
Writing a value to a variable by multiple threads in the same time is not safe.
Writing a value to a variable by one thread in the same time as one ore more threads are reading from this variable is not safe.

So using the same lock in both setter and getter is required.
Problem described in @Servy answer requires a better solution though. Any flavour of locking mechanism which wraps so called "SELECT FOR UPDATE" (I know this goes for DB but the problem is the same) should be good enough.

You should even reuse the same lock you already have in your code. Make it public since it's readonly and for such situations use it from outside:

lock(exam.lckobj){
    exam.myInt = exam.myInt + 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks- that's what I needed to know. edit: wait- don't these statements contradict each other? "Reading a value of a variable by multiple threads in the same time is safe." "Reading a value of a variable by one thread in the same time as one ore more threads are reading from this variable is not safe." –  alykins Apr 29 at 18:48
    
Fixed typos - now it makes sense –  ElmoVanKielmo Apr 30 at 9:23

For integer values use Interlocked.Read and Interlock.Exchange. Very atomic, very thread safe, doesn't carry the weight of a mutex (via lock).

share|improve this answer
    
Just using an atomic read/write does not make a program thread safe. In fact, the example program wouldn't be thread safe just by using these methods in the properties getter/setter. –  Servy Apr 29 at 19:24
    
@Servy If the getter is get { return Interlocked.Read(ref foo); } and the setter is set { Interlocked.Exchange(ref foo, value); } how is that not atomic and therefore thread safe? –  focuspark Apr 30 at 16:32
    
It is atomic, but just because that one operation is atomic then that doesn't make the entire program thread safe. Let's say that the property represents an int. If someone writes foo.ThatIntProperty++; while another thread is doing the same thing in another thread, the program is not going to function properly. If the property returns a reference to a mutable reference type, say a List, and that object is mutated from one thread while another is reading from it, all sorts of badness can happen. –  Servy Apr 30 at 16:35
    
@Servy While I don't disagree that bad habits create bad code, if Interlocked is used to access the variable (and I did specifically say integer value, though any base value type if fine really) use of Interlocked is 100% thread safe and an order of magnitude more efficient than use of lock or a WaitHandle. –  focuspark Apr 30 at 16:49
    
No, it's not safe. I just provided an example of a completely broken program that uses your implementation of a property. it is not safe in the least. Making the property getter/setter atomic in no way guarantees that the program will function properly. Making your program more efficient is irrelevant when it doesn't work. –  Servy Apr 30 at 16:51

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