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I want to create a server/client system using akka remoting. At first I create a simple remote Server. (I wrote the code below for testing purposes and to clarify my concepts so it really doesn't do much.)

I want my client to send a username and a password to the server which the server can verify and reply back. At first I create a client actor. From my client object I send this actor the username and password (I use future here). The client actor then uses another future to send this username and password to the server.

The server in my code gets the username and password and prints it out. The problem is I dont get anything back from the server. Since I used a future to send the information to the server, it should reply back with a result. This is where I think I have a conceptual problem. Going through the akka documentation did not clarify this. But I an sure I am messing up something very basic. The server code is:

EDITED after suggestions from TrustNoOne and cmbaxter.

package server


import collection.mutable
import akka.actor._
import com.typesafe.config.ConfigFactory
import shared._
import shared.CaseClass._

object Server extends App { 
val system = ActorSystem("ServerSystem",
     ConfigFactory.parseString("""
   akka {
     actor {
       provider = "akka.remote.RemoteActorRefProvider"
     }
     remote {
       netty.tcp {
         hostname = 127.0.0.1
         port = 5555
       }
     }
   }
 """))
system.actorOf(Props[ServerActorClass], "ServerActor")
}

class ServerActorClass extends Actor {
  def receive = {
    case userPass: UserPass => {
      sender ! verified()
      println(userPass)
    }
    case testMsg: String => println("Got a msg"+ testMsg)
  }
}

The client code is:

package client

import ...

object Client extends App {
  val system = ActorSystem("ClientSystem",
    ConfigFactory.parseString("""
   akka {
     actor {
       provider = "akka.remote.RemoteActorRefProvider"
     }
     remote {
       netty.tcp {
         hostname = 127.0.0.1
         port = 0
       }
     }
   }
  """))
  val clientActor = system.actorOf(Props[ClientActor], name = "ClientActor") //the local actor

  implicit val timout = Timeout(50 seconds)
  val f = ask(clientActor, UserPass("a","b"))
  f.onSuccess {
    case GO => println("Got something back from Client actor") //Still doesn't happen!
  }
}


class ClientActor extends Actor {

  // create the remote actor
  val server = context.actorFor("akka.tcp://ServerSystem@127.0.0.1:5555/user/ServerActor")

  implicit val timout = Timeout(1 seconds)

  def receive = {
    case a: String => println("back" + a)
    case a: UserPass => { 
      val f: Future[Any] = (server ? a) 
      f.onSuccess {
        case response: verified => {
          println("Got something back from server") //Does happen now!
          val asker = sender()
          asker ! GO()
        }
        case response: verificationFailed => {
           val asker = sender() 
           asker ! NO()
        }
      }
    }
  } 
}

Case classes that are shared by both the client and the server:

package shared
case object CaseClass {
  case class verified //Server msg to acknowledge user and pass successful verification
  case class verificationFailed //Server msg saying user pass verification failed
  case class GO
  case class NO
  case class UserPass(user:String, pass:String)

I want to know what I am doing wrong. If someone could explain rather than just point out the problem, it would be great, since I am looking to learn.

share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried adding different callbacks to your Future to try to print onFailure for example, see if anything wrong happens? –  vptheron Apr 29 at 19:12
    
just tried. Nothing changes. Is this because futures do not act the same way with remote actors the way would with local ones? Is there any restriction like that? –  1xQ Apr 29 at 19:18
2  
If you use an onComplete instead of onSuccess as suggested by @vptheron, you should at the very least get a timeout Failure if you do not get a response within one second. Also, onSuccess is a PartialFunction, so if it's not defined for the type of result returned, nothing happens. Try adding a case any => println(any) into your onSuccess callback –  cmbaxter Apr 29 at 19:28
    
It's impossible. If you put a callback on onFailure you'll at least see a timeout like @cmbaxter said. –  vptheron Apr 29 at 19:30
    
vptheron, cmbaxter: You are right.I added the case any => println(any) to onSuccess callbacks of both the futures.I get back: class shared.CaseClass$verified$ [INFO] [04/29/2014 15:38:59.251] [ClientSystem-akka.actor.default-dispatcher-4] [akka://ClientSystem/deadLetters] Message [shared.CaseClass$GO$] from Actor[akka://ClientSystem/user/ClientActor#1894492213] to Actor[akka://ClientSystem/deadLetters] was not delivered. [1] dead letters encountered. This logging can be turned off or adjusted with configuration settings 'akka.log-dead-letters' and 'akka.log-dead-letters-during-shutdown'. –  1xQ Apr 29 at 19:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the server actor, you're sending the response like this:

sender ! CaseClass.verified

You are actually sending the "verified" class companion object back to the client. You should either make the verified class a case object or send back to the client a verified instance:

sender ! CaseClass.verified()

You are doing other (unrelated) errors:

  • closing over sender in the future callback (make a local alias val replyTo = sender())
  • not respecting naming conventions (capital letters, etc)
  • using deprecated "actorFor". you have to use actorSelection (see akka docs)
share|improve this answer
1  
"You cannot pattern match inside the future's onSuccess callback". Wrong! The onSuccess callback is simply a partial function taking a Any and returning Unit. You can of course pattern match on it. –  cmbaxter Apr 29 at 19:22
    
@cmbaxter Could you please elaborate? –  1xQ Apr 29 at 19:27
    
it's closing over the sender in the ClientActor, in the pattern match that does not work. –  TrustNoOne Apr 29 at 19:27
1  
just add case x => println(x.getClass) to the pattern match that doesn't work, and you'll see it prints the name of the "verified" class –  TrustNoOne Apr 29 at 19:28
1  
You mean where you say you want to know what you're doing wrong? You basically are saying in the onSuccess "if the result is an instance of 'verified' do this, else if it's an instance of 'verificationFailed', then do that". The problem is that the response is an instance of the 'verified' class companion object, not an instance of the class. If "verified" is meant to be a singleton, you should declare it as a case object, and pattern match against it with case verified => ... –  TrustNoOne Apr 29 at 19:55

You're exiting without waiting for a response.

implicit val timout = Timeout(50 seconds)
val f: Future[Any] = clientActor ? UserPass("s","a")
f.onSuccess {
  case GO => println("Got something back from Client actor") //Doesnt happen!
}

That sets up a handler for a callback, but then your program just exists.

Minimally, you could scala.concurrent.Await.result(f)

share|improve this answer
    
That's not the problem, he's not shutting down the actor system, his App never exits. The problem is that he is sending verified (the companion object) instead of verified() (an instance). Look at my answer –  TrustNoOne Apr 29 at 19:56
    
oh, good point. it'll probably bite him next though ;) –  Rob Starling Apr 29 at 19:58
    
@RobStarling But wouldn't including scala.concurrent.Await.result(f) make the operation synchronous. I mean won't that become a blocking call? –  1xQ Apr 30 at 6:31
    
@RobStarling tried to do what you suggested. However, I still receive the msg dead letters encountered when trying to send GO(). Could you please explain why scala.concurrent.Await.result(f) needs to be used? Is it to keep the actor alive until it receives the message? What do you think still causes the error to persist? –  1xQ Apr 30 at 11:34
    
@1xQ yes, main would block. i only meant to say that you might need it to keep the program from exiting, but TrustNoOne pointed out that unless you shut down the actor system (which you should do), that's not the problem. –  Rob Starling Apr 30 at 14:58

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