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I need to vertically align Images inside of horizontal layout with fluid height (100%). The most appropriate method to center vertically without a fixed height, I found so far, is to use display: table, table-row and table-cell. With the following code, the centering works so far:

<div class="itemwrap">
  <div class="imagecenterrow">
  <div class="imagecentercell">
    <img src="..." title="...">
  </div>
  </div>
</div>

with

.itemwrap {
  display: table;
  height: 100%;
}
.imagecenterrow {
  display: table-row;
}
.imagecentercell {
  display: table-cell;
  height: 100%;
  vertical-align: middle;
}
.imagecentercell img {
  max-height: 100%;
  max-width: 100%;
}

The images seem to ignore the height of the table-cell DIV and are all displayed in their original sizes (exceeding the 100% height of the parent elements). The vertical cerntering works though. Any ideas on restricting the images to the boundaries of the table-cell? (They must not be cropped)

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

Dont forget, max-height and max-width will ONLY work in relaation to values defined on the same element for height and width, which you currently dont have set. You will need to define these in order for it to work, removing the max- part should work for you.

Demo Fiddle

More on max-height from MDN

The max-height CSS property is used to set the maximum height of a given element. It prevents the used value of the height property from becoming larger than the value specified for max-height.

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set the max-height of the image to a value that is less than table's height

.itemwrap img {
max-height: 5px;
}

just edit 5px


you can even add internal spaces using padding

.imagecentercell img {
padding: 10px!important;
}
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