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so I am trying to create a Sudoku Board in Python and have the NN run and learn to solve it. But I am having issues trying to set these initial values to 0. Rather than having to write out a1=0, a2=0, etc. Is there a faster way to assign these values in a simple code? Thanks.

def create():
print '| - - - | - - - | - - - |',
print '|', a1, a2, a3, '|', b1, b2, b3, '|', c1, c2, c3, '|',
print '|', a4, a5, a6, '|', b4, b5, b6, '|', c4, c5, c6, '|',
print '|', a7, a8, a9, '|', b7, b8, b9, '|', c7, c8, c9, '|',
print '| - - - | - - - | - - - |',
print '|', d1, d2, d3, '|', e1, e2, e3, '|', f1, f2, f3, '|',
print '|', d4, d5, d6, '|', e4, e5, e6, '|', f4, f5, f6, '|',
print '|', d7, d8, d9, '|', e7, e8, e9, '|', f7, f8, f9, '|',
print '| - - - | - - - | - - - |',
print '|', g1, g2, g3, '|', h1, h2, h3, '|', i1, i2, i3, '|',
print '|', g4, g5, g6, '|', h4, h5, h6, '|', i4, i5, i6, '|',
print '|', g7, g8, g9, '|', h7, h8, h9, '|', i7, i8, i9, '|',
print '| - - - | - - - | - - - |',
share|improve this question
    
I don't know neural network, but if you have a bit of flexibility in the declarations, a list or other similar data structure would probably make your life a lot easier. –  StephenTG Apr 29 '14 at 20:22
    
Use list and for loop instead of using different variables. for eg. [a.append(0) for i in range(9)]. –  RTL Apr 29 '14 at 20:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're probably going to want to use a list for this.

If you really want to keep it the way you're doing it, you can do this:

a1 = a2 = a3 ... = i9 = 0

or to save some writing space

#(0,)*81 is the same thing as writing 0, 0, ..., 0
a1, a2, a3, ..., i9 = (0,)*81 

but I suggest you use a list of lists.

Here's a list comprehension that creates a list of 9 zeros:

a = [0 for x in range(9)]

Use this idea to create a list comprehension that creates a list of 9 lists.

grid = [[0 for x in range(9)] for y in range(9)]

Then you can access grid like so:

>>> print grid[0][0]
>>> 0
>>> print grid[8][8]
>>> 0
>>> print grid
>>> [[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]
share|improve this answer
    
Your first suggestion won't work, it should be a1 = a2 ... = 0 or a1, a2, ... = 0, 0, ... –  jonrsharpe Apr 29 '14 at 20:40
    
@jonrsharpe Thanks, fixed it. –  Matthew Apr 29 '14 at 20:49

When working with such structures in Python I would definitly suggest to give a look at the numpy.matrix.

You can just write

>>> import numpy
>>> m = numpy.zeros(shape=(9,9))
share|improve this answer
3  
There is an important distinction between a numpy.matrix and a numpy.array, particularly when multiplying them together. You mention a matrix, but your code creates an array! –  Hooked Apr 29 '14 at 21:44
    
@Hooked You're definitely right! I suggested to look at the matrix part, while providing what I thought to be the easiest way to obtain the required structure, that is in fact just an array. However passing this array to the matrix constructor should be enough in order to obtain the eventually-required numpy.matrix object. –  5agado Apr 29 '14 at 21:52

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