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The goal of this program is to create a composite 2D Array class from a 1D array class, utilizing pointers and operator[] for use in the main program. We were told to get [][] to work just like a standard 2D array. I get it to compile but it is crashing when I utilize the 2DArray class. I know the goal is to understand pointers but I think the operator[] is giving me the most trouble. Any insight would be most appreciated.

Edit: Works find with standard arrays. However I would be happy if I could just utilize the class in a simple manner such as:

#include <iostream>
#include "MyArray.h"
#include "TwoDArray.h"

using namespace std;

int main()
{
TwoDArray test(4,5);
cout << "Test output:  "<< test[3][2] << endl;
return 0;
}

Here is the code for the 2D Array Class Implementation:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include "TwoDArray.h"
#include "MyArray.h"


TwoDArray::TwoDArray()
{
    //Default Constructor
    row = 10;
    col = 10;
    MyArray** p = new MyArray* [10];
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        p[i] = new MyArray[10];
    }
}

TwoDArray::TwoDArray (int r, int c)
{
    row = r;
    col = c;
    MyArray** p = new MyArray* [col];
    for (int i = 0; i < col; i++)
    {
        p[i] = new MyArray[row];
    }
}

TwoDArray::~TwoDArray() //Destructor 
{
    for (int i = 0; i < row; i++)
    {
        delete [] &p[i];
    }
    delete [] p;
}

MyArray & TwoDArray::operator[] (int pos)
{
    if( pos < 0 || pos >= col )
    {
        cout << "Illegal index, pos = " << pos << endl;
    }
    return *p[pos];
}

As well as the 1DArray (MyArray) class implementation given by the instructor:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include "MyArray.h"    // "" around header means "look in current directory first"

// default to an array of 10 integers, fill with 0
MyArray::MyArray()
{
    int i;
    _a = new int[10];    // new allocates RAM from system heap, [] says allocate an array
    _n = 10;
    for( i = 0; i < 10; i++ )
    {
        _a[i] = 0;       // initialize array to all 0
    }
}

// allocate array of a size requested by the client if legal, fill with 0
MyArray::MyArray( int num )
{
    int i;
    if( num <= 0 ) // if illegal, set to default
    {
        num = 10;
    }
    _a = new int[num];
    _n = num;
    for( i = 0; i < num; i++ )
    {
        _a[i] = 0;       // initialize array to all 0
    }
}

// copy constructor - invoke deep copy asignment
MyArray::MyArray( const MyArray &m )
{
   *this = m;
}

// destructor - needed to deallocate RAM allocated in constructors
MyArray::~MyArray()
{
    delete[] _a;
}

// get value at position pos
int &MyArray::At( int pos )
{
    if( pos < 0 || pos >= _n )
    {
        cout << "Illegal index, pos = " << pos << endl;
        exit( -1 );
    }
    return _a[pos];
}

// get value at position pos using [] indexing operator
int & MyArray::operator []( int pos )
{
    cout << "1D [] pos = " << pos << "_n is " << _n << endl;
    if( pos < 0 || pos >= _n )
    {
        cout << "Illegal index, pos = " << pos << endl;
        exit( -1 );
    }
    return _a[pos];
}

// return size, const here means it cannot change self
int MyArray::size( void ) const
{
    return _n;
}

// deep copy - REQUIRED if allocated RAM is used by object!
MyArray &MyArray::operator =( const MyArray &rhs )
{
    int i;
    if( &rhs == this ) // assignment to self?
    {
        return *this;  // if so, don't assign, just return self
    }
    if( rhs._n != _n )   // rhs not the same size as myself?
    {
        delete[] _a;    // yes, clear out my data and reallocate to match
        _a = new int[rhs._n];
        _n = rhs._n;
    }
    for( i = 0; i < rhs._n; i++ )  // copy all elements
    {
        _a[i] = rhs._a[i];
    }
    return *this;      // allow a = b = c; assignment
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you show us the code you're calling that's crashing? –  cppguy Apr 29 at 20:32
    
Aside from the destructor issue cppguy mentioned, your 2D-array also seems to be missing a copy-constructor and copy-assignment operator. –  Daan Apr 29 at 20:38
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5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You still have a few issues with your code.

Issue 1:

Your operator[] will not compile if the TwoDArray is a const object. Here is an example

void foo(const TwoDArray& arr)
{
   int x = arr[0][0];  // error.  operator [] must be const
}

It is perfectly reasonable to have a const TwoDArray here, as you are not changing the internals of the array. Therefore you need to overload operator [] twice, once for const objects, another for non-const. So the second overload should look like this:

const MyArray & TwoDArray::operator[] (int pos) const
{
    if( pos < 0 || pos >= col )
    {
        cout << "Illegal index, pos = " << pos << endl;
    }
    return *p[pos];
}

However, there is still an issue here, which I will show in Issue 3 below.

Issue 2: Your assignment operator will corrupt this if new[] fails.

In your assignment operator, you call delete[] _a. What happens if the subsequent call to new [] throws an exception? You have now corrupted the object, since you deleted the memory and therefore you can't recover that deleted data.

What should be done, at least in your implementation, is to

  1. allocate the new memory first, and assign to a temporary pointer,
  2. move the data from the passed-in object to the new memory,
  3. Delete the old memory (in this case, this is where you finally call delete [] _a;)
  4. assign the temporary pointer in step 1 to _a.

This way, if step 1 fails, an exception would be thrown, and your object will not get corrupted.

Issue 3: In your operator [], if an out-of-bounds access is done, you still go ahead and execute the illegal access.

If you want to have the user of the class shoot themselves in the foot if they give an out-of-bounds access, then I think you should remove the cout message and just go ahead and allow the illegal access. If you do want to have a bounds-checked access, use an at() function that can output and throw an exception on an out-of-bounds access.

Note that this is how std::vector does things -- the operator [] is unchecked, while std::vector::at() is checked and will throw on error.

Issue 4:. Stylistic -- Beware of starting your variable names with underscores.

Underscored names are reserved for the compiler's implementation. I know that there are instances where underscored names are safe, but I always play it safe and never introduce names that start with underscores.

Issue 5: Do you want to have a 2d array using operator[]?
There are arguments against using [][] to represent a 2-d matrix, and instead, have operator() represent the indices.

See here: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq/matrix-subscript-op.html

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If MyArray itself is an 1D array, then your are doing it wrong my initialising a 2D Array with MyArray. I am not describing the details, but I think you need to do something like this -

TwoDArray::TwoDArray()
{
//Default Constructor
row = 10;
col = 10;
MyArray* p = new MyArray [10];
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    p[i] = new MyArray(10);
} }

TwoDArray::TwoDArray (int r, int c)
{
row = r;
col = c;
MyArray* p = new MyArray [col];
for (int i = 0; i < col; i++)
{
    p[i] = new MyArray(row);
}
}

notice that I changed the 2D initialisation with a 1D array each of which is internally a MyArray object which itself is an array - thus the 2D array

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure why you pass parameter r and c, then assign internally to row and col. Why not just have parameters row and col? Is there something I am missing? Maybe this question is more for OP than for you... but you kept it. –  Floris Apr 29 at 20:54
    
Good point, thank you. –  user3586816 Apr 29 at 20:57
    
@Floris good point, actually I didn't optimise it intentionally and kept it unfinished for OP because it's a university learning project. I just wanted to point him to the allocation problem. :) But thanks for pointing out. –  activehigh Apr 29 at 21:05
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Your destructor is a little over-thought. Try this:

TwoDArray::~TwoDArray() //Destructor 
{
    delete [] p;
}

You're also not storing the pointer you allocate in your constructor. You're assigning your allocated memory to a pointer you declare on the stack. Not your member p

Also you're allocating a 2D array of arrays which would make a 3D array

In your constructors assign your member p an array of MyArray's like this:

TwoDArray::TwoDArray()
{
    //Default Constructor
    row = 10;
    col = 10;
    p = new MyArray[row]; // where p is a MyArray* member of TwoDArray
    for (int i = 0; i < row; i++)
    {
        p[i] = MyArray(col);
    }
}

TwoDArray::TwoDArray (int r, int c)
{
    row = r;
    col = c;
    p = new MyArray[row]; // where p is a MyArray* member of TwoDArray
    for (int i = 0; i < row; i++)
    {
        p[i] = MyArray(col);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip on the destructor. Lots of good advice in here. –  user3586816 Apr 29 at 20:59
    
Have you tried running valgrind or other utility to confirm that your "simple destructor" doesn't leave some unreachable memory? I would have thought you need to delete the individual 1D arrays before destroying the 2D array that points to them. But I come from a C background - maybe C++ is smarter than that... –  Floris Apr 29 at 21:52
    
if the destructor of MyArray isn't cleaning up its own internals, that's a bug that can be fixed easily. But delete[] guarantees all of the destructors of each item (in this case ~MyArray) in the deleted array will be called –  cppguy Apr 30 at 0:56
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Your constructor for TwoDArray is flawed here: for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { p[i] = new MyArray[10]; }

You are creating in fact a 3D array!! change it to p[i] = new MyArray(10);

and continue from there!

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If I understand your code right, MyArray represents one row of TwoDArray. In that case, the constructors of TwoDArray are not creating MyArray objects with the the right argument.

You have:

TwoDArray::TwoDArray()
{
    //Default Constructor
    row = 10;
    col = 10;
    MyArray** p = new MyArray* [10];
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        p[i] = new MyArray[10];
    }
}

First of all, I would change the use of 10 to use row and col appropriately.

TwoDArray::TwoDArray()
{
    //Default Constructor
    row = 10;
    col = 10;
    MyArray** p = new MyArray* [row];
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        p[i] = new MyArray[col]; // This is a problem line. You are creating col
                                 // MyArray objects. I think you should create one
                                 // MyArray object with col items in it.

        p[i] = new MyArray(col); // This is what you want.
    }
}

But the real problem is that you have:

    MyArray** p = new MyArray* [row];

This is a local variable. It goes away when you return from the function. The member variable p remains uninitialized. What you probably meant was:

    p = new MyArray* [row];

You can change other constructor similarly.

cppguy has already pointed out the problem with the destructor.

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