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Related question: Moving repository trunk to another’s branch (with history)

I know that one can dump a complete SVN repository with history and load it into a user-defined (sub)directory of the target repository using:

// in source repo
> svnadmin dump . > mydumpfilename

// in destination repo (backslashes because I'm using Windows)
> svnadmin load . < mydumpfilename --parent-dir some\sub\directory

But this will import the full repository into the target repository's sub-directory. What I want is to define a sub-directory in the source repository that should be exported. Something like svnadmin dump . --source-path old\sub\dir > mydumpfilename.

How can I achieve that? If TortoiseSVN can do that, please say so ;)

SOLUTION: Thanks to Tim Henigan's answer, here's the correct way to do it:

// execute in destination repo
svndumpfilter include source\sub\dir < mydumpfilename | svnadmin load . --parent-dir destination\sub\dir

Hope this will help others, too...

share|improve this question
I think you can't do that, other than manually copying and re-applying every change, as subversion revisions are repository wide, so moving a single directory with history doesn't really apply in this case. i.e. not single files are revisioned but the whole repository is revisioned and diffs of the whole repository are stored – Zenon Feb 25 '10 at 20:49
Great question, thanks. – richo Jun 22 '11 at 2:35
Actually this is only half of the story. You have to remove the directory in the source repository, too, by rebuilding it using svndumpfilter exclude source\sub\dir of course, see… – Tino Jan 31 '12 at 12:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Check out svndumpfilter and this section on Repository Maintenance.

Once you have a dumpfile for the entire old repository, you can use svndumpfilter to extract just the portion that you want.

I am not aware of a way to do this with TortoiseSVN.

share|improve this answer
Very nice solution, works perfectly. Thank you very much! – AndiDog Feb 25 '10 at 21:02
And if you're confused why it's not working on your local machine, it's because svndump is supposed to be run on the actual repository source. Use svnrdump instead --… – drzaus Jun 5 at 20:02

A little late to the party, but... if you have pulled local copies of both repositories using TortoiseSVN, you can actually copy a directory from one to the other with history by right-clicking on the directory (or file) from Repo1 and dragging it to Repo2. When you release the mouse you will get this list of options:

enter image description here

"SVN Export versioned items here" will copy (recursively) with history.

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I'm not getting history, nor is it adding the files to the repo -- what I'm I missing? – drzaus Jun 5 at 19:53
@drzaus: After you move the items locally, you need to commit them to the repo. Until you do so, SVN won't register the items or history in the new repo. – noisiveRevision Jun 6 at 21:47
Just to make sure I understand -- after exporting, I need to manually add all the unversioned files I just exported, and then after committing them SVN will have included their history? – drzaus Jun 8 at 15:30
@drzaus I don't recall if it is necessary to add them first (I thought that was part of the export), but if the files are showing up with question marks that means they are not staged and need to be added before they can be committed. You can do so recursively by right-clicking on the top-most directory and selecting Tortoise SVN > Add... which should have a "Select All" option. After the files are added (staged) you should be able to commit them to your repo. – noisiveRevision Jun 9 at 21:49

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