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Is there a way to make this look a little better?

conn.exec 'select attr1, attr2, attr3, attr4, attr5, attr6, attr7 ' +
          'from table1, table2, table3, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc, ' +
          'where etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc'

Like, is there a way to imply concatenation?

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I'm not sure if i well understood your question ... You can try that : result = "SELECT #{attr1} FROM {#tables} WHERE #{etc}" Ruby will resolve the content of #{} as ruby code and replace it by the result of the command. So you can concatenate what ever you want. Note : Most of the time, if you have a lot of strings to concatenate this method is more performant than the one using the + operator. –  Nicolas Guillaume Feb 25 '10 at 20:56
3  
Be careful about SQL injection attacks. :) –  Roy Tinker Oct 13 '11 at 19:28
    
Haha It's Obviously super safe :p –  Nicolas Guillaume Oct 13 '11 at 23:41
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9 Answers 9

up vote 76 down vote accepted

Yes, if you don't mind the extra newlines being inserted:

 conn.exec 'select attr1, attr2, attr3, attr4, attr5, attr6, attr7
            from table1, table2, table3, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc,
            where etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc'

Alternatively you can use a heredoc:

conn.exec <<-eos
   select attr1, attr2, attr3, attr4, attr5, attr6, attr7
   from table1, table2, table3, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc,
   where etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc
eos
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46  
You could also use %Q(...) –  BaroqueBobcat Feb 25 '10 at 21:38
    
So that doesn't insert a newline? works for me. –  Zombies Feb 25 '10 at 21:59
3  
@Zombies: Newlines are typically allowed in SQL statements and are just treated as ordinary whitespace. –  Mark Byers Feb 25 '10 at 22:02
2  
see my answer below for an example, you can just use % now. –  Robbie Guilfoyle Aug 28 '13 at 1:35
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There are pieces to this answer that helped me get what I needed (easy multi-line concatenation WITHOUT extra whitespace), but since none of the actual answers had it, I'm compiling them here:

str = 'this is a multi-line string'\
  ' using implicit concatenation'\
  ' to prevent spare \n\'s'

=> "this is a multi-line string using implicit concatenation to eliminate spare
\\n's"

As a bonus, here's a version using funny HEREDOC syntax (via this link):

p <<END_SQL.gsub(/\s+/, " ").strip
SELECT * FROM     users
         ORDER BY users.id DESC
END_SQL
# >> "SELECT * FROM users ORDER BY users.id DESC"

The latter would mostly be for situations that required more flexibility in the processing. I personally don't like it, it puts the processing in a weird place w.r.t. the string (i.e., in front of it, but using instance methods that usually come afterward), but it's there.

This doesn't save much typing, but it looks nicer than using + signs, to me.

EDIT: Adding one more:

p %{
SELECT * FROM     users
         ORDER BY users.id DESC
}.gsub(/\s+/, " ").strip
# >> "SELECT * FROM users ORDER BY users.id DESC"
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3  
this should be the correct answer –  khoomeister Sep 18 '13 at 23:42
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There are multiple syntaxes for multi-line strings as you've already read. My favorite is Perl-style:

conn.exec %q{select attr1, attr2, attr3, attr4, attr5, attr6, attr7
      from table1, table2, table3, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc,
      where etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc}

The multi-line string starts with %q, followed by a {, [ or (, and then terminated by the corresponding reversed character. %q does not allow interpolation; %Q does so you can write things like this:

conn.exec %Q{select attr1, attr2, attr3, attr4, attr5, attr6, attr7
      from #{table_names},
      where etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc}

I actually have no idea how these kinds of multi-line strings are called so let's just call them Perl multilines.

Note however that whether you use Perl multilines or heredocs as Mark and Peter have suggested, you'll end up with potentially unnecessary whitespaces. Both in my examples and their examples, the "from" and "where" lines contain leading whitespaces because of their indentation in the code. If this whitespace is not desired then you must use concatenated strings as you are doing now.

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2  
from #{table_names} would not work in this example, as you used %q{}, it would work if you used %q[] or () –  MatthewFord Jun 16 '11 at 17:22
2  
My favorite in this vein is just %{ super multiline string with interpolation support } –  Duke Oct 21 '11 at 0:58
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In ruby 2.0 you can now just use %

For example:

SQL = %{
SELECT user, name
FROM users
WHERE users.id = #{var}
LIMIT #{var2}
}
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1  
Works in Ruby 1.9.3 too. –  Andy Stewart Sep 20 '13 at 10:02
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conn.exec = <<eos
  select attr1, attr2, attr3, attr4, attr5, attr6, attr7
  from table1, table2, table3, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc,
  where etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc
eos
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conn.exec 'select attr1, attr2, attr3, attr4, attr5, attr6, attr7 ' <<
        'from table1, table2, table3, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc, ' <<
        'where etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc'

<< is the concatenation operator for strings

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1  
The other answers use heredocs, which is a fine alternative –  Dom Brezinski Feb 25 '10 at 20:54
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If you do mind extra spaces and newlines, you can use

conn.exec %w{select attr1, attr2, attr3, attr4, attr5, attr6, attr7
  from table1, table2, table3, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc,
  where etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc} * ' '

(use %W for interpolated strings)

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conn.exec [
  "select attr1, attr2, attr3, ...",
  "from table1, table2, table3, ...",
  "where ..."
].join(' ')

This suggestion has the advantage over here-documents and long strings that auto-indenters can indent each part of the string appropriately. But it comes at an efficiency cost.

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@Aidan, You can replace the commas with backslashes (a la C) and no join (or array) will be needed: The interpreter will concatenate the strings at (I think) parse time, making it pretty quick compared to most of the alternatives. One advantage, though, of joining an array of strings is that some auto-indenters do nicer work than they do with, for example, here-doc strings or with \. –  Wayne Conrad Feb 26 '10 at 15:18
1  
One note, the heredoc syntax <<- will allow appropriate indentation. –  A. Wilson May 18 '11 at 12:41
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Sometimes is worth to remove new line characters \n like:

conn.exec <<-eos.squish
 select attr1, attr2, attr3, attr4, attr5, attr6, attr7
 from table1, table2, table3, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc,
 where etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc
eos
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