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I'm designing a class hierarchy that follows a diamond pattern, and I'm trying to debug through about a million errors right now; however, most of them are simple fixes that I should be able to figure out. However, I'm having difficulty understanding the compiler's complaints in this one.

Basically, I start off with a simple Entity class that has two derived classes: Buyer and Seller. A fourth class Retailer, in turn, is descended from both classes - that is, it uses multiple inheritance(and yes, I know what kind of mess that's asking for, unfortunately that's exactly the point of the project).

for reference, the header files for my classes is as follows: Entity.h

#pragma once
#include <string>

class Entity    {
public:
  Entity(std::string &, std::string &, double);
  /*Accessor methods for private members*/
  std::string getName();
  std::string getID();
  double getBalance();
  /*Mutator methods for private members*/
  void setName(std::string &);
  void setID(std::string &);
  void setBalance(double);
  /*Additional methods*/
  virtual void list();
  virtual void step() = 0;

protected:
  /*Private members of the entity class*/
  std::string name;
  std::string id;
  double balance;
};

for the Buyer.h file

#pragma once
#include "Entity.h"
#include "Order.h"
#include "Seller.h"
#include <queue>
#include <string>

class Seller;
class Buyer : virtual public Entity     {
public:
  Buyer(std::string, std:: string, double);
  virtual ~Buyer() { }
  void addSeller(Seller *);
  std::queue<Seller *> getSellers();
  void addOrder(Order *);
  void list();
  void step() override;
protected:
  std::queue<Order *> orders;
  std::queue<Seller *> sellers;
};

For Seller.h

#pragma once
#include "Entity.h"
#include "Order.h"
#include "Buyer.h"
#include "Inventory.h"
#include <string>
#include <vector>

class Buyer;
class Seller : virtual public Entity    {
public:
  Seller(std::string, std::string, double);
  virtual ~Seller() {}
  void addBuyer(Buyer *);
  std::vector<Buyer> getBuyers();
  void setInventory(Inventory *);
  Inventory * getInventory();
  void list();
  double fillOrder(Order *);
  void step();
protected:
  Inventory inventory;
  std::vector<Buyer *> buyers;
};

And finally for Retailer.h

#pragma once
#include "Buyer.h"
#include "Seller.h"
#include <string>

class Retailer : public Buyer, public Seller    {
public:
  Retailer(std::string, std::string, double);
  virtual ~Retailer() { }
  void list();
  void step();
};

The majority of the errors I get when trying to compile these files are along the lines of

Buyer.h:9:7: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 0 provided
Seller.h:14:3: note:   candidate expects 3 arguments, 0 provided

Which is odd, because for that first line, I shouldn't even have to provide an argument and the second one is the definition of the constructor....

Basically, what I'm failing to understand is what does the compiler mean by a line of code expecting a different number of arguments than were provided? Should I be including default constructors that use no arguments? Is there something wrong with the way they're declared? I can also post the code for my .cpp files if necessary, although they don't seem to be mentioned a lot by the compiler error reports.

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Those "errors" you posted are additional info relating to other errors which you didn't post. Try posting the actual errors. Possibly you didn't invoke Entity's constructor correctly in the code which you haven't shown. Show all the code relevant to the error. –  Matt McNabb Apr 30 at 2:16
    
I actually realized that a little bit ago. Unfortunately, the full error list is much longer than I could actually copy in to a post. However, the answer below has already helped me find the problem in most of the code that causes the compiler to act up. It seems most of my problems are actually trickle down from failing to include some files in each other - in other words, circular reference failure. –  Vincents Apr 30 at 2:26
1  
In such cases, start with the first error and fix that, sometimes that'll also fix other errors that were caused by the first eror. –  Matt McNabb Apr 30 at 2:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It means that the compiler is considering that function for overload resolution, but it's not a match because of differing number of arguments.

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