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I have one table, which has a filed. When I insert in that table with the Empty value like '' or null, it should get converted to 'DUMMY-VALUE'.

--Have one table;
CREATE TABLE TEST  ( FIELD1 VARCHAR2(50) );

--When I insert ''
INSERT INTO TEST(FIELD1) VALUES('');

SELECT * FROM TEST
--Expected Result 'DUMMY-VALUE' but not NULL

I can apply NVL('','DUMMY-VALUE') in INSERT statement but I am allowed to change CREATE statement only. For Now, I am handing this with TRIGGER but , wondering if there is any alternative in 11g however I know about DEFAULT ON NULL for oracle 12c.

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5  
How about making the column with a default value as 'DUMMY-VALUE'? and inserting without that field if the values is NULL or empty? –  TechDo Apr 30 '14 at 10:37
    
No, default value will not work because NULL or '' will override the default value, However your suggestion will work only if the column name is not mentioned during insert. –  touchchandra May 28 '14 at 11:18

2 Answers 2

You can do like this:

create table TEST  (FIELD1 VARCHAR2(50) default 'DUMMY-VALUE'  );

and when you want to insert you should insert without that field if the values is NULL or empty

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1  
This will actually work only if FIELD1 is not provided in the insert statement. Passing NULL explicitly will bypass default value. –  Kombajn zbożowy Apr 30 '14 at 19:45
    
yoy can look this: sqlfiddle.com/#!4/68dbf/1/0 –  Ersin Gülbahar May 2 '14 at 19:09
    
I meant this: sqlfiddle.com/#!4/02938/1. Note I can insert NULL into field1 explicitly. –  Kombajn zbożowy May 3 '14 at 7:40

Try this:

CREATE TABLE TEST (FIELD1 VARCHAR2(50) DEFAULT 'DUMMY-VALUE');

then use the DEFAULT keyword in the INSERT statement:

INSERT INTO TEST (FIELD1) VALUES (DEFAULT);

SQLFiddle here

Share and enjoy.

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Thanks for the good hint bob, but this will force to insert DEFAULT in all cases. –  touchchandra May 28 '14 at 11:25

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