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I am not an expert in sql. My wordpress started to return timeouts and respond really slow. when I started digging, I noticed that the slow_query log has a lot to tell me. unfortunately I have a lot of slow queries. for example:

# Time: 140425 17:03:29
# User@Host: geektime[geektime] @ localhost []
# Query_time: 7.024031  Lock_time: 0.000432 Rows_sent: 0  Rows_examined: 0
SET timestamp=1398434609;

SELECT wp_posts.*
FROM wp_posts
INNER JOIN wp_postmeta ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id)
INNER JOIN wp_postmeta AS mt1 ON (wp_posts.ID = mt1.post_id)
LEFT JOIN wp_postmeta AS order1 ON order1.post_id = wp_posts.ID
AND order1.meta_key = '_event_start_date'
LEFT JOIN wp_postmeta AS order2 ON order2.post_id = wp_posts.ID
AND order2.meta_key = '_event_start_time'
WHERE 1=1
  AND wp_posts.post_type = 'event'
  AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish'
       OR wp_posts.post_status = 'future'
       OR wp_posts.post_status = 'draft'
       OR wp_posts.post_status = 'pending')
  AND ((wp_postmeta.meta_key = '_event_start_date'
        AND CAST(wp_postmeta.meta_value AS CHAR) BETWEEN '2014-04-11' AND '2014-04-17')
       OR (mt1.meta_key = '_event_end_date'
           AND CAST(mt1.meta_value AS CHAR) BETWEEN '2014-04-11' AND '2014-04-17'))
GROUP BY wp_posts.ID
ORDER BY order1.meta_value,
         order2.meta_value ASC;

The columns post_id, meta_id and meta_key are indexed in wp_postmeta table. The columns ID, post_name, post_type, post_status, post_date,post_parent, post_author and guid are indexed in wp_posts table.

however, the columns ID and GUID are indexed twice, is it bad?

and there are 4 indexs with the same key_name: type_status_date, is it bad?

How could it be that I have 60K rows in wp_posts and 3M rows in wp_postmeta?

I know its a lot to ask but I really tried to understand from researching online.

thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Does this WordPress installation center around some specialized application like event scheduling? What plugins do you have in it? –  Ollie Jones Apr 30 '14 at 11:48
    
unfortunately we are using a lot of plugins. but for above query, you are probably right, it probably has to do with the plugin Events Manager. –  Meschiany Apr 30 '14 at 11:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

however, the columns ID and GUID are indexed twice, is it bad?

There are two different columns, so no, unless you're meaning that both have two indexes on them — in which case yes, it's bad and likely a bug in one of your theme or plugins (or a prior bug in WP itself).

and there are 4 indexs with the same key_name: type_status_date, is it bad?

Same as above: if you mean four identical indexes, it's either a theme or plugin or WP bug and you can safely drop the duplications.

How could it be that I have 60K rows in wp_posts and 3M rows in wp_postmeta?

Because the WP meta API sucks and enforces a database anti-pattern called the Entity Attribute Value (also known as EAV):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entity-attribute-value_model

Cursory googling SO will yield plenty of threads that explain why it is a bad idea to store data in an EAV or equivalent (json, hstore, xml, whatever) if the stuff ever needs to appear in e.g. a where, join or order by clause.

You can see the inefficiencies first-hand in form of the slow query you highlighted. The query is joining the meta table four times, does so twice with a cast operator to boot — and it casts the value to char instead of date at that. Adding insult to injury, it then proceeds to order rows using values stored within it. It is a recipe for poor performance.

There is, sadly, little means of escaping the repulsive stench of this sewage, short of writing your own plugins that create proper tables to store, index and query the data you need in lieu of using the WP meta API, its wretched quoting madness, and the putrid SQL that results from using it.

One thing that you can do as temporary duct tape and WD-40 measure while you rewrite the plugins you're using from the ground up, is to toss callbacks on one or more of the filters you'll find in the giant mess of a class method that is WP_Query#get_posts(). For instance the posts_request filter, which holds the full and final SQL query, allows you to rewrite anything to your liking using regex-foo. It's no magic bullet: doing so will allow you to fix bugs such as integer values getting sorted lexicographically and such, as well as toss in very occasional query optimizations; little more.

Edit: Upon re-reading your query, methinks you're mostly in luck with respect to that last point. Your particular query features the following abomination:

INNER JOIN wp_postmeta ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id)
INNER JOIN wp_postmeta AS mt1 ON (wp_posts.ID = mt1.post_id)
LEFT JOIN wp_postmeta AS order1 ON order1.post_id = wp_posts.ID
AND order1.meta_key = '_event_start_date'
LEFT JOIN wp_postmeta AS order2 ON order2.post_id = wp_posts.ID
AND order2.meta_key = '_event_start_time'

Two of those have _event_start_date in common, so you can factor it out:

SELECT wp_posts.*
FROM wp_posts
INNER JOIN wp_postmeta ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id)
       AND wp_postmeta.meta_key = '_event_start_date'
INNER JOIN wp_postmeta AS mt1 ON (wp_posts.ID = mt1.post_id)
       AND mt1.meta_key = '_event_end_date'
INNER JOIN wp_postmeta AS order2 ON order2.post_id = wp_posts.ID
AND order2.meta_key = '_event_start_time'
WHERE 1=1
  AND wp_posts.post_type = 'event'
  AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish'
       OR wp_posts.post_status = 'future'
       OR wp_posts.post_status = 'draft'
       OR wp_posts.post_status = 'pending')
  AND (CAST(wp_postmeta.meta_value AS CHAR) BETWEEN '2014-04-11' AND '2014-04-17'
       OR CAST(mt1.meta_value AS CHAR) BETWEEN '2014-04-11' AND '2014-04-17')
GROUP BY wp_posts.ID
ORDER BY wp_postmeta.meta_value,
         order2.meta_value ASC;
share|improve this answer

Among other things, slow performance is caused by the use of functions like this:

AND CAST(wp_postmeta.meta_value AS CHAR) BETWEEN '2014-04-11' AND '2014-04-17')

Assuming that field is a date field, you will get better performance with something like this:

 and wp_postmeta.meta_value >= AStartDateVariable 
 and wp_postmeta.meta_value < TheDayAfterAnEndDateVariable

That will be even more true if meta_value is indexed. I assume you will be sending these variables as query parmameters.

share|improve this answer
    
I compared the queries and it helped by half a second, from 14 sec to 13 and a half. should i index meta_value as well? –  Meschiany Apr 30 '14 at 12:41
    
Indexing speeds up database reading but slows down database writing. Hence your dilemma. –  Dan Bracuk Apr 30 '14 at 12:57
    
@DanBracuk: sadly, the field is stored as text, and OP has no control over that... –  Denis de Bernardy Apr 30 '14 at 13:00

Holy cow! 3 megarows in postmeta? 60k posts? Something is seriously wrong with your installation.

  1. Is it possible that your events table is open to spammers entering rubbish?
  2. Do you have tons of old expired events that could somehow be purged from your system?

You may be able to get your system back on the air by increasing your timeout value. If you know how to handle php.ini, go find the timeout value and increase it, or ask your hosting company for help.

Are you on one of those $5 per month hosting companies? With sixty thousand events to handle, you may need to upgrade.

The proximate cause of the timeout is obvious. This sequence of code is full-scanning that monster post_meta table TWICE!

Why? It has an OR in it. And it is applying functions to the value of a column.

AND ((wp_postmeta.meta_key = '_event_start_date'
    AND CAST(wp_postmeta.meta_value AS CHAR) BETWEEN '2014-04-11' AND '2014-04-17')
     OR (mt1.meta_key = '_event_end_date'
       AND CAST(mt1.meta_value AS CHAR) BETWEEN '2014-04-11' AND '2014-04-17'))

One of the disadvantages of the WordPress schema when you scale up a site is the generic nature of the postmeta table. This query does date range searches, but it's hard to index a key-value repository like postmeta to optimize those.

Do you know your way around the code of the Events Manager plugin you're using? If so, you may want to investigate optimizing this yourself.

If not, seek support from the Events Manager plugin developer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the insights. i have a dedicated server. the 60K posts is reasonable because we are really big tech blog with 100 writers, but why the miss correlation between the amount of posts and postmeta? we dont have spam and most of the posts arent events. –  Meschiany Apr 30 '14 at 12:30
    
when i removed the line after the 'or' statement (event end date) the time dropped from 14 sec to 0.02 sec. –  Meschiany Apr 30 '14 at 12:46

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