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Inside a createAndShowGUI() method called by javax.swing.SwingUtilities.invokeLater like this...:

public static void main(String[] args) { 
    javax.swing.SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
        public void run() { 
            createAndShowGUI(); 
        } 
    }); 
}

...I have the following piece of code which launches multiple threads with invokeLater where each threads increments the value of progBar when it is ran:

int times = 20;

for(int x = 0; x < times; x = x+1) {
        new Thread("T") {
                public void run() {

                        try {                                              
                            Thread.sleep(5000);

                        } catch(InterruptedException ex) {
                            Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
                        }

                        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
                                public void run() {
                                        progBar.setValue(progBar.getValue()+1);
                                }
                        });

                }

        }.start();

}

How can I know where all the threads are finished? If I use a counter inside invokeLater I think I will I run into race conditions.. So what is the right way to do it? Should I use a mutex? Are there some facilities provided by Swing to this purpose? Thanks.

I have implemented the code in this way according to http://www.java2s.com/Code/Java/Threads/InvokeExampleSwingandthread.htm

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1  
@mKorbel kleopatra Thanks, that is right, correcting that part of the code. –  jj_ Apr 30 at 13:20
1  
@mKorbel: why is it a bug if some rules you have invented do not work? Modifying data models from different threads used by Swing from the EDT at the same time never was allowed. So if you found a jre version where it happens to work it’s just working by accident but not a rule. –  Holger Apr 30 at 13:27
1  
@mKorbel: where is the official documentation to your claim? Just because it happened to work does not imply that it is thread-safe. It may just imply that the optimizer did a lousy job in that version. Or that you just had a luck. –  Holger Apr 30 at 13:40
1  
@mKorbel: you are reversing the logic. You can catch a bug by luck but you can not prove the correctness of your code by luck. If the specification does not say it ought to work (and in this case it explicitly states that it is wrong), it is not a bug if it doesn’t work. –  Holger Apr 30 at 13:48
2  
@mKorbel: And the JDK 6 Swing API is pretty clear (at the end of the page): This restriction also applies to models attached to Swing components. For example, if a TableModel is attached to a JTable, the TableModel should only be modified on the event dispatching thread. If you modify the model on a separate thread you run the risk of exceptions and possible display corruption. Nothing more to say… –  Holger Apr 30 at 13:52

3 Answers 3

The Runnables you pass to invokeLater are all executed on the single Event Dispatch Thread. Due to the fact that they are all sent by different threads there is no particular order but they are executed one after another.

So once you have fixed your code by moving the UI updates into the Runnable you are passing to invokeLater you can use Swings notification mechanism to get informed about the finishing of the jobs:

final int end=progBar.getValue() + times;
progBar.addChangeListener(new ChangeListener() {
  public void stateChanged(ChangeEvent e) {
    if(progBar.getValue()==end) {
      System.out.println("all jobs finished");
    }
  }
});
for(int x = 0; x < times; x = x+1) {
  new Thread("T") {
    public void run() {
      try {                                              
          Thread.sleep(5000);
      } catch(InterruptedException ex) {
          Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
      }
      SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
              public void run() {
                progBar.setValue(progBar.getValue()+1);
              }
      });
    }
  }.start();
share|improve this answer
    
please (Apolo 13 ???) you forgot for break; –  mKorbel Apr 30 at 13:22
1  
This code does not care about the JProgressBar’s range. It uses the same variable for starting times number of threads and for waiting to reach old progress value +times. –  Holger Apr 30 at 13:32
1  
@jj_: Since the invokeLater is placed after the sleep, it is executed after the sleep as intended. There may be other threads in their sleep call but the particular thread executing invokeLater surely has completed its sleep operation. That ordering within a thread does not change (not even from other threads perspective as invokeLater is a thread-safe operation). –  Holger Apr 30 at 14:13
1  
That’s right. Sometimes the key point is to be aware of what does update the UI (as it might be hidden in another method you invoke), but the principle is clear, do background things in the background thread and update the UI afterwards using invokeLater. Other tools like ExecutorService or SwingWorker are just tools to make it easier to implement such things, but the logic stays the same. –  Holger Apr 30 at 14:55
1  
@jj_: reading the component’s state from a different thread while updates are ongoing in the EDT will cause problems as well. There are only a few exceptions, i.e. reading a simple property (not calculated from multiple properties) represented by an immutable value type (e.g. String) might work. Reading properties that are definitely not updated while you read them (which are under your control) would be ok too. –  Holger May 2 at 7:41

InvokeLater actually runs everything that is invoked from the Swing EventDispatchThread - which is probably not what you want at all. They will not run at the same time, they will each run one after the other. What's even worse is that in your example you are making changes to the Swing controls from your thread, but then using InvokeLater afterwards.

This means the counter would actually be thread safe.

What you probably want here is to use a 'SwingWorker' or an 'ExecutorService' and post the results back to the EDT for display.

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The bit of code in my question is inside a a createAndShowGUI method which is called by an "outer" javax.swing.SwingUtilities.invokeLater like this: public static void main(String[] args) { javax.swing.SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {public void run() { createAndShowGUI(); } }); } so I'm already in the EDT. –  jj_ Apr 30 at 12:45
    
new Thread("T") { public void run() { –  Tim B Apr 30 at 13:03
    
The contents of run() are happening on your new Thread called T, not in the EDT –  Tim B Apr 30 at 13:04
    
This is exactly what I thought, but if I omit the invokeLater call, the code blocks on each sleep, while if I use invokeLater below (like I did) it does not! Please check the link I provided, it's done in the same way (but it's just one thread). –  jj_ Apr 30 at 13:08
    
It seems like you have some fundamental holes in your understanding of threading but I don't really have time to go through them now. Take a look at SwingWorker and just use that to do the work, it will handle all this for you. –  Tim B Apr 30 at 13:10

How can I know where all the threads are finished? If I use a counter inside invokeLater I think I will I run into race conditions..

  • not possible because this is endless loop without break;

So what is the right way to do it?

  • JProgressBar has range from zero to 100 in API, just to test if value in loop is 100 or greather, then to use break;

  • use Runnable#Thread instead of plain vanilla Thread

for example (the same output should be from SwingWorker, but there are is used more than 12 instances, AFAIK note there was a bug about overloading number of..., but for purpose as code for forum is possible to create similair code by using SwingWorker)

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

import java.awt.Component;
import java.util.Random;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JProgressBar;
import javax.swing.JScrollPane;
import javax.swing.JTable;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;
import javax.swing.table.DefaultTableModel;
import javax.swing.table.TableCellRenderer;

public class TableWithProgressBars {

    private static final int maximum = 100;
    private JFrame frame = new JFrame("Progressing");
    Integer[] oneRow = {0, 0, 0, 0};
    private String[] headers = {"One", "Two", "Three", "Four"};
    private Integer[][] data = {oneRow, oneRow, oneRow, oneRow, oneRow,};
    private DefaultTableModel model = new DefaultTableModel(data, headers);
    private JTable table = new JTable(model);

    public TableWithProgressBars() {
        table.setDefaultRenderer(Object.class, new ProgressRenderer(0, maximum));
        table.setPreferredScrollableViewportSize(table.getPreferredSize());
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frame.add(new JScrollPane(table));
        frame.pack();
        frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        frame.setVisible(true);
        new Thread(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                Object waiter = new Object();
                synchronized (waiter) {
                    int rows = model.getRowCount();
                    int columns = model.getColumnCount();
                    Random random = new Random(System.currentTimeMillis());
                    boolean done = false;
                    while (!done) {
                        int row = random.nextInt(rows);
                        int column = random.nextInt(columns);
                        Integer value = (Integer) model.getValueAt(row, column);
                        value++;
                        if (value <= maximum) {
                            model.setValueAt(value, row, column); 
                            // model.setValueAt(... must be wrapped into invokeLater()
                            // for production code, otherwise nothing will be repainted
                            // interesting bug or feature in Java7 051, looks like as 
                            // returns some EDT features from Java6 back to Java7 ???
                            try {
                                waiter.wait(15);
                            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                                e.printStackTrace();
                            }
                        }
                        done = true;
                        for (row = 0; row < rows; row++) {
                            for (column = 0; column < columns; column++) {
                                if (!model.getValueAt(row, column).equals(maximum)) {
                                    done = false;
                                    break;
                                }
                            }
                            if (!done) {
                                break;
                            }
                        }
                    }
                    frame.setTitle("All work done");
                }
            }
        }).start();
    }

    private class ProgressRenderer extends JProgressBar implements TableCellRenderer {

        private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

        public ProgressRenderer(int min, int max) {
            super(min, max);
            this.setStringPainted(true);
        }

        @Override
        public Component getTableCellRendererComponent(JTable table, Object value,
                boolean isSelected, boolean hasFocus, int row, int column) {
            this.setValue((Integer) value);
            return this;
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                new TableWithProgressBars();
            }
        });    
    }
}
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2  
@mKorbel: Swing’s threading policy: All Swing components and related classes, unless otherwise documented, must be accessed on the event dispatching thread. So where is it documented that you can modify a table model from a different thread? –  Holger Apr 30 at 13:30
2  
@mKorbel: your description is not an official documentation. Unless otherwise documented, using that method from another thread is not allowed. Even if it happens to run on a particular version, on your machine. –  Holger Apr 30 at 13:35
1  
@mKorbel until x is less than 20 keep adding 1 to x and looping. So at some point x will not be less than 20 anymore and loop will end. What is wrong here? Look at this? jdoodle.com/a/6n –  jj_ Apr 30 at 13:44
1  
@mKorbel: I don’t see what that link is going to prove. There, again, you are the only one claiming that calling Swing stuff from outside the EDT ought to work. It doesn’t matter whether there are differences in the behavior between Java6 and Java7, you have written broken code which the JREs execute exactly as specified: by exhibiting undefined behavior. Fix your code instead of blaming the JRE. Your notorious self-references are no prove. –  Holger Apr 30 at 14:02
2  
DefaultTableModel uses Vector, which is thread-safe, but I'm reluctant to rely on that implementation detail. –  trashgod May 3 at 22:10

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