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I am new to ruby. I need to receive password as an input through gets command.

How do I hide the password input typed in the terminal, during gets call

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

"Password" is another alternative.

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Thanks..exactly I was looking for – jsampath Feb 26 '10 at 20:35
2  
This answer should be deprecated in favour of @eclectic923 core ruby solution. – Rich Sep 26 '15 at 12:18

One can also use core ruby.

$ ri IO.noecho

 (from ruby core)
 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   io.noecho {|io| }
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Yields self with disabling echo back.

   STDIN.noecho(&:gets)

 will read and return a line without echo back.

For 1.9.3 (and above), this requires you adding require 'io/console' to your code.

require 'io/console'
text = STDIN.noecho(&:gets)
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15  
For 1.9.3, this requires you adding require 'io/console' to your code. Way better than any gem option usually. – icco Aug 22 '12 at 14:43
1  
I cannot +1 this answer enough. Beats having to include extra gems any day! – mydoghasworms Dec 5 '12 at 8:10
1  
This is the right way of doing this in my opinion – Cort3z Jan 18 '13 at 12:17
11  
don't forget to .chomp your input! pass = STDIN.noecho(&:gets).chomp – avguchenko Mar 4 '14 at 5:06

There is a library called highline which works like this:

require 'rubygems'
require 'highline/import'

password = ask("Enter password: ") { |q| q.echo = false }
# do stuff with password
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As the others mention, you can use IO#noecho for Ruby >= 1.9. If you'd like support for 1.8, you can shell out to the read builtin shell function:

begin
  require 'io/console'
rescue LoadError
end

if STDIN.respond_to?(:noecho)
  def get_password(prompt="Password: ")
    print prompt
    STDIN.noecho(&:gets).chomp
  end
else
  def get_password(prompt="Password: ")
    `read -s -p "#{prompt}" password; echo $password`.chomp
  end
end

Now getting a password is as easy as:

@password = get_password("Enter your password here: ")

Note: In the implementation using read above, you'll run into trouble if you (or some other client of get_password) passes along special shell characters in the prompt (e.g. $/"/'/etc). Ideally, you should escape the prompt string before passing it along to the shell. Unfortunately, Shellwords isn't available in Ruby 1.8. Fortunately, it's easy to backport the relevant bits yourself (specifically shellescape). With that, you can make this slight modification:

  def get_password(prompt="Password: ")
    `read -s -p #{Shellwords.shellescape(prompt)} password; echo $password`.chomp
  end

I mentioned a couple problems with the use of read -s -p in a comment below:

Well, the 1.8 case is a little janky; it doesn't allow for backslashes, unless you hit backslash twice: "The backslash character `\' may be used to remove any special meaning for the next character read and for line continuation." Also: "The characters in the value of the IFS variable are used to split the line into words. " This should probably be fine for most little scripts, but you'd probably want something more robust for larger applications.

We can fix some of those problems by rolling up our sleeves and doing this the hard with stty(1). An outline of what we need to do:

  • Store the current terminal settings
  • Turn of echoing
  • Print the prompt & get user input
  • Restore the terminal settings

We must also take care to restore the terminal settings when interrupted by signals and/or exceptions. The following code will properly handle job control signals (SIGINT/SIGTSTP/SIGCONT) while still playing nicely with any present signal handlers:

require 'shellwords'
def get_password(prompt="Password: ")
  new_sigint = new_sigtstp = new_sigcont = nil
  old_sigint = old_sigtstp = old_sigcont = nil

  # save the current terminal configuration
  term = `stty -g`.chomp
  # turn of character echo
  `stty -echo`

  new_sigint = Proc.new do
    `stty #{term.shellescape}`
    trap("SIGINT",  old_sigint)
    Process.kill("SIGINT", Process.pid)
  end

  new_sigtstp = Proc.new do
    `stty #{term.shellescape}`
    trap("SIGCONT", new_sigcont)
    trap("SIGTSTP", old_sigtstp)
    Process.kill("SIGTSTP", Process.pid)
  end

  new_sigcont = Proc.new do
    `stty -echo`
    trap("SIGCONT", old_sigcont)
    trap("SIGTSTP", new_sigtstp)
    Process.kill("SIGCONT", Process.pid)
  end

  # set all signal handlers
  old_sigint  = trap("SIGINT",  new_sigint)  || "DEFAULT"
  old_sigtstp = trap("SIGTSTP", new_sigtstp) || "DEFAULT"
  old_sigcont = trap("SIGCONT", new_sigcont) || "DEFAULT"

  print prompt
  password = STDIN.gets.chomp
  puts

  password
ensure
  # restore term and handlers
  `stty #{term.shellescape}`

  trap("SIGINT",  old_sigint)
  trap("SIGTSTP", old_sigtstp)
  trap("SIGCONT", old_sigcont)
end
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Well, the 1.8 case is a little janky; it doesn't allow for backslashes, unless you hit backslash twice: "The backslash character `\' may be used to remove any special meaning for the next character read and for line continuation." Also: "The characters in the value of the IFS variable are used to split the line into words. " This should probably be fine for most little scripts, but you'd probably want something more robust for larger applications. – Charles Mar 28 '13 at 15:05

For ruby version 1.8 (or Ruby < 1.9) I used read shell builtin as mentioned by @Charles.

Putting the code thats just enough to prompt for user name & password, where user name will be echoed to screen while typing in however password typed in would be silent.

 userid = `read -p "User Name: " uid; echo $uid`.chomp
 passwd = `read -s -p "Password: " password; echo $password`.chomp
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