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I have a list of objects (call them type salesItems) Lets say these items have 50 properties, with Name, price, quantity being 3 of them). I would like to know how to merge the list together combining any salesItems by name using the following logic:

If there are multiple salesOrders that have the same Name:

  • Combine them into one SalesOrder with the same Name
  • Set the quantity to the sum of the quantities
  • Set the price, and all of the other properties using the values of the first

I would like to do with linq. I realize i could use a big for each c# loop instead.

If there are additional items in the list I would like to follow similar logic for those as well.

EX:    A salesOrder list with (A,B,C,D,E)

A: Name=ball  Price= 2.24  Quantity=1   (other values = bla bla)
B: Name= ball  Price = 15.33  Quantity=3   (other values)
c: Name= bat  Price = 22.14  Quantity=3    (other values)
D: Name= bat Price= 19.22 Quantity=2    (other values)
E: Name = ball Price=4.32 Quantity=2   (other values)

Result list I want 2 Sales orders in list (A,C) A: Name=ball Price= 2.24 Quantity=6 (other values = bla bla from a's properties) c: Name= bat Price = 22.14 Quantity=5 (other values from c's properties)

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you show your SalesItem class and a sample list? That would make it easier to understand. Pseudo-"code" as list (A,C) is just confusing. –  Tim Schmelter Apr 30 '14 at 14:01
    
look at Linq's Intersect<> methods... GroupBy also might help you here with a Distinct() combo... short answer for what you want to do though is that you won't get away from looping... LINQ is just that: behind the scenes looping... but you can group your items and perform your changes on a smaller dataset using LINQ though... –  MaxOvrdrv Apr 30 '14 at 14:01
    
Have you made any attempt to solve the problem yourself? Share your code! –  Daniel Mann Apr 30 '14 at 14:01

2 Answers 2

You want linq's .GroupBy method!!!

I've defined your class as:

public class SalesOrder
{   
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public double Price { get; set; }
    public int Quantity { get; set; }

    public SalesOrder(string Name, double Price, int Quantity)
    {
        this.Name = Name;
        this.Price = Price;
        this.Quantity = Quantity;
    }
}

then I have created a list of your orders like this:

List<SalesOrder> Orders = new List<SalesOrder>()
{
    new SalesOrder("Ball", 2.24, 1),
    new SalesOrder("Ball", 15.33, 3),
    new SalesOrder("Bat", 22.14, 3),
    new SalesOrder("Bat", 19.22, 2),
    new SalesOrder("Ball", 4.32, 2)
};

and grouped them by the name before selecting the values you want for each group into a new instance of the SalesOrder class like this:

List<SalesOrder> Combined_Orders = Orders
    .GroupBy (o => o.Name)
    .Select (o => new SalesOrder(o.Key, o.Select (x => x.Price).First(), o.Sum(x => x.Quantity)))
    .ToList();

UPDATE: In response to OP's comment

As the real SalesOrder will have hundreds of properties, you can avoid typing them all out in the linq query by adding a constructor to the SalesOrder class that accepts the result of the group by as an argument, then do all the work in the constructor. While it doesn't stop you from having to type out all the properties, it does mean that its neatly abstracted away. Also this way it forces/enables you to decide on what to do with each of the properties (first/sum/average).

To do this you will need a second constructor that looks like this:

    public SalesOrder(IGrouping<string, SalesOrder> Group)
    {
        this.Name = Group.Key;
        this.Price = Group.First().Price;
        this.Quantity = Group.Sum(g => g.Quantity);
        // do all other properties here too
    }

Then update the group by to look like this (note that only the result of the grouping "g" is passed into the constructor now):

List<SalesOrder> Combined_Orders = Orders
    .GroupBy (o => o.Name)
    .Select (g => new SalesOrder(g))
    .ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
This post seems like it should work but what I would like to know is if there is any way I can do it by essentially updating the existing sales order objects. My biggest issue with this approach is this...if the SalesItem class has say 100 different properties and I'd have to use new and name each and every property from the first item (other than the quantity)? Failing that, I would be happy to accept this as a solution. –  jvoigt Apr 30 '14 at 15:10
    
It works with normal linq (I tested it in linqpad, it would need some modifications for other types of linq like linq to entities). I'm not sure if you are going to be able to get away with typing out the property names at least once, but you could adjust the constructor to accept a one of the groups, and do all the work in the constructor (I'll add it to my answer in a minute) –  Ben Apr 30 '14 at 15:16
    
I did a typo in the comment above, but it won't let me edit it now! I meant that I didn't think you could get away without typing the property names, not with –  Ben Apr 30 '14 at 15:37
    
That is a good clean approach. It worked out. –  jvoigt Apr 30 '14 at 19:19
    
Glad to hear it! fancy accepting my answer then? ;-P –  Ben May 2 '14 at 10:13

Hi You can use the following code,

class SalesItem
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Price { get; set; }
    public int Quantity { get; set; }
}

class SalesOrder
{
    public void LoadItems()
    {
        List<SalesItem> SalesItems = new List<SalesItem>();

        SalesItem salesitem = new SalesItem()
        {
            Name = "Ball",
            Price = 12,
            Quantity = 1
        };

        SalesItems.Add(salesitem);

        salesitem = new SalesItem()
        {
            Name = "Ball",
            Price = 36,
            Quantity = 3
        };

        SalesItems.Add(salesitem);

        salesitem = new SalesItem()
        {
            Name = "Bat",
            Price = 50,
            Quantity = 1
        };

        SalesItems.Add(salesitem);

        salesitem = new SalesItem()
        {
            Name = "Ball",
            Price = 84,
            Quantity = 7            
        };

        SalesItems.Add(salesitem);

        salesitem = new SalesItem()
        {
            Name = "Bat",
            Price = 150,
            Quantity = 3
        };

        SalesItems.Add(salesitem);

        GroupOrders(SalesItems);
    }

    public List<SalesItem> GroupOrders(List<SalesItem> SalesItems)
    {
        var list = from item in SalesItems
                   group item by item.Name into orders
                   select new SalesItem
                   {
                       Name = orders.Key,
                       Price = orders.Sum(X=>X.Price),
                       Quantity = orders.Sum(X=>X.Quantity)
                   };

        List<SalesItem> resultList = new List<SalesItem>();
        foreach (SalesItem saleitem in list)
        {
            resultList.Add(saleitem);
        }
        return resultList;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
OP wanted the first orders price for each group, not the sum of price. –  Ben Apr 30 '14 at 14:45
    
Ben is correct, I was hoping to use the price from the first. I did have one other question concenting creating the objects by using the constructor. –  jvoigt Apr 30 '14 at 15:12
    
You could do that by changing the ling query as below, var list = from item in SalesItems group item by item.Name into orders select new SalesItem { Name = orders.Key, Price = orders.First().Price, Quantity = orders.Sum(X=>X.Quantity) }; –  vikasse Apr 30 '14 at 15:16

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