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I just write some scala code:

class Cat[T]
val x: Cat[_ <: String] = new Cat[String]

It can be compiled, but I don't understand it well.

You can see I declare the type of x as Cat[_ <: String], which means

Cat[ T forSome { type T <: String; }]

But, what can I do with x when it has this special type? Is there any condition that I have to declare x like this for later usage?

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You can do with x anything you can do with Cat[T] where T is String (plus more). I'm not too strong on this side of Scala but you should look at this page. Also consider rephrasing your question. It is not very clear what you're asking. –  Andrey Apr 30 at 15:00

3 Answers 3

You don't understand because you picked a poor example. This is exactly like Java variance, so, for instance, you can do this:

import java.utii.{ArrayList, List => JList}

val x: JList[_ <: Object] = new ArrayList[String]

Even though Java's List and its implementing classes are not co-variant (because there's no such notion in Java, among other things), you can declare that 'x' is a "co-variant" List, and assign it a subclass of, in this case, Object.

Your example is bad because you picked Cat[String] instead of Cat of a subclass of String.

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The type parameter of Cat in Cat[_ <: String] is an existential type. Much of the motiviation for them was to have an equivalent to Java's wildcards, so Scala could continue to interoperate with Java despite its (psychotic) generics. To quote from a Martin Odersky intervew:

Bill Venners: Would you have added existential types if you didn't need to worry about the Java compatibility concerns of wildcards, raw types, and erasure. If Java had reified types and no raw types or wildcards, would Scala have existential types?

Martin Odersky: If Java had reified types and no raw types or wildcards, I don't think we would have that much use for existential types and I doubt they would be in Scala.

Here is a blog post by one of the Scala developers discussing existential types back when they were added to the language. Here is blog post by discussing them in greater depth.

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But, what can I do with x when it has this special type?

This type isn't particularly special. You can e.g. pass it to methods which take this type, etc. but then you can also do the same if you declare it to be Cat[String], which is more specific

Is there any condition that I have to declare x like this for later usage?

One possibility is if you want x to be overridden:

class Foo {
  val x: Cat[_ <: Object] = new Cat[Object]
}

class Bar extends Foo {
  override val x: Cat[_ <: Object] = new Cat[String]
}

class Baz extends Bar {
  override val x: Cat[_ <: Object] = new Cat[File]
}

Neither of these overrides would be possible without type signatures in Foo and Bar respectively.

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