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    synchronized (countList) {
        while (iter.hasNext()) {
            Entry<Long, Long> entry = iter.next();
            if(entry.getVaue>0)
                 entry.output();
        }
        countList.clear();
    }

with

    synchronized (countList) {
        while (iter.hasNext()) {
            Entry<Long, Long> entry = iter.next();
            if(entry.getVaue>0)
                 entry.output();
            iter.remove();
        }
    }

Is there a real difference? I am guessing that maybe garbage collection is better for the collection.clear method.

share|improve this question
1  
Define "better". –  Andrew Feb 26 '10 at 2:54
2  
Why not benchmark it and see? –  Anon. Feb 26 '10 at 2:54
    
@Andrew, faster, considering syncronization. –  TiansHUo Feb 26 '10 at 3:00
    
What's the concrete type of your collection? –  Uri Feb 26 '10 at 3:02
    
Did you miss out where you get the iterator from the collection, inside the synchronized block? –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 26 '10 at 3:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

There are situations where N remove()s through the iterator would yield O(N log N), or even worse, O(N^2) performance (e.g. on an ArrayList). I can't think of any scenario where clear() would perform as badly.

I would say that clear() is probably better. It's done as one operation, so implementations can optimize it better since it's not an incremental modification to the collection that remove() is (where invariants need to be maintained, etc).

Also, collection iterators must guard against IllegalStateException and/or ConcurrentModificationException. With N remove()s, that's N checks, which can add up. Finally, as a reminder, not all iterators support remove().

Think of it this way:

  • N remove() operations are done through a middleman (the iterator), and it puts the collection into N different states before it becomes empty
  • 1 clear() is a direct operation on the collection, and it's only 1 state transition
share|improve this answer
2  
clear is definitely better –  KitsuneYMG Feb 26 '10 at 3:13
    
You should've said "clear is clearly better" =) –  polygenelubricants Feb 26 '10 at 3:16
    
Pretty much by definition clear will always be at least as good, and with very few exceptions, orders of magnitude better. –  Lawrence Dol Feb 26 '10 at 6:26

I presume iter.remove is called for every entry, right? It is better(performance degradation when removing one by one - it depends on the collection implementation how much slower) to invoke clear at the end or just let the collection to be garbage collected.

synchronized (countList) {
    while (iter.hasNext()) {
        Entry<Long, Long> entry = iter.next();
        if(entry.getVaue>0) {
             entry.output();
        }
        iter.remove();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Why comment that clear() is better, and then provide an example which uses remove()? –  Lawrence Dol Feb 26 '10 at 6:25
    
See polygenelubricants's response –  adrian.tarau Feb 27 '10 at 3:28

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