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I have one file that presents the following estructure:

.
.
LAST_NAME_IN_CAPS_1, First_1    Cell Phone: 999-999-999
Address
Needham MA 02135
Status: Attender    Marital:    Married Adult:  Y   M/F:    M   Env.No.:

Salutation:


LAST_NAME_IN_CAPS_2, First_2    Cell Phone: 999-999-999
Address 
Needham MA 02135
E-mail :    email@gmail.com
Status: Attender    Marital:    Married Adult:  Y   M/F:    F   Env.No.:

Salutation:
.
.

The information between lines change a lot, what I want is to obtain a regular expression that takes the block of code that between two cap words larger than 3 letters including the first cap word. In this case i would like to include LAST_NAME_IN_CAPS_1 and everything before LAST_NAME_IN_CAPS_2, what regular expression can handle that?

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Are you expecting non-ASCII letters in your names? If you do, this task becomes complicated. – Tim Pietzcker Apr 30 '14 at 16:32
    
No I don't expect them. – Leonardo Apr 30 '14 at 18:03
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming ASCII letters only, and that your data is in a variable called text, you should be able to use something like the following:

import re
matches = re.findall(r'^[A-Z]{3}.*?(?=^[A-Z]{3}|\Z)', text, re.S | re.M)

The re.S (or re.DOTALL) makes it so that . will match line breaks, the re.M (or re.MULTILINE) flag makes it so that ^ and $ will match at the beginning and ends of lines respectively rather than just at the beginning and end of the string. The \Z is an anchor to the end of the string, and (?=...) is a positive lookahead.

So here is a description of what this regex does:
Match starting at a line that begins with three uppercase characters (^[A-Z]{3}), then match any number of characters (as few as possible) including line breaks (.*?) until you would be able to match the beginning of a line that starts with three uppercase characters or you have reached the end of the string ((?=^[A-Z]{3}|\Z)).

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This might be easier with a simple regex that detects the lines of interest and then manually splitting on those idices.

Given this test string:

txt='''\
.
.
LAST_NAME_IN_CAPS_1, First_1    Cell Phone: 999-999-999
Address
Needham MA 02135
Status: Attender    Marital:    Married Adult:  Y   M/F:    M   Env.No.:

Salutation 1:

LAST_NAME_IN_CAPS_2, First_2    Cell Phone: 999-999-999
Address
Needham MA 02135
Status: Attender    Marital:    Married Adult:  Y   M/F:    M   Env.No.:

Salutation 2:


LAST_NAME_IN_CAPS_3, First_3    Cell Phone: 999-999-999
Address 
Needham MA 02135
E-mail :    email@gmail.com
Status: Attender    Marital:    Married Adult:  Y   M/F:    F   Env.No.:

Salutation 3:
.
.'''

Try:

idx=[m.start(1) for m in re.finditer(r'^([A-Z_0-9]+,\s+)', txt, re.S | re.M)]
print [txt[i:j] for i,j in zip([0]+idx, idx+[None])[1:]]

Prints:

['LAST_NAME_IN_CAPS_1, First_1    Cell Phone: 999-999-999\nAddress\nNeedham MA 02135\nStatus: Attender    Marital:    Married Adult:  Y   M/F:    M   Env.No.:\n\nSalutation 1:\n\n', 
 'LAST_NAME_IN_CAPS_2, First_2    Cell Phone: 999-999-999\nAddress\nNeedham MA 02135\nStatus: Attender    Marital:    Married Adult:  Y   M/F:    M   Env.No.:\n\nSalutation 2:\n\n\n', 
 'LAST_NAME_IN_CAPS_3, First_3    Cell Phone: 999-999-999\nAddress \nNeedham MA 02135\nE-mail :    email@gmail.com\nStatus: Attender    Marital:    Married Adult:  Y   M/F:    F   Env.No.:\n\nSalutation 3:\n.\n.']

Note: I only use r'^([A-Z_0-9]+,\s+)' to match the pattern in your example; if you have 'all caps' that match a different pattern, use that obviously.


And for a Python only solution (no regex) you can do:

lines=txt.splitlines()

line_idx=[i for i, line in enumerate(lines) 
                     if line.partition(',')[0].isupper()]

print [lines[i:j] for i,j in zip([0]+line_idx, line_idx+[None])][1:]         

Prints:

[['LAST_NAME_IN_CAPS_1, First_1    Cell Phone: 999-999-999', 'Address', 'Needham MA 02135', 'Status: Attender    Marital:    Married Adult:  Y   M/F:    M   Env.No.:', '', 'Salutation 1:', ''], 
 ['LAST_NAME_IN_CAPS_2, First_2    Cell Phone: 999-999-999', 'Address', 'Needham MA 02135', 'Status: Attender    Marital:    Married Adult:  Y   M/F:    M   Env.No.:', '', 'Salutation 2:', '', ''], 
 ['LAST_NAME_IN_CAPS_3, First_3    Cell Phone: 999-999-999', 'Address ', 'Needham MA 02135', 'E-mail :    email@gmail.com', 'Status: Attender    Marital:    Married Adult:  Y   M/F:    F   Env.No.:', '', 'Salutation 3:', '.', '.']]

The advantage of the non-regex version is it it easier to support international characters:

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

txt='''\
ABÇ, 
ABC, 
abc, 
ĖFG, '''

print [i for i, line in enumerate(txt.splitlines()) 
               if line.partition(',')[0].isupper()]
# [0, 1, 3]
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