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So, for one reason or another, I'm testing the limits of C# and the .NET VM. I came across a bit of perplexing behavior.

Take these classes and interfaces:

public interface ITest
{
    void Test();
    void Test2();
}
public abstract class Base : ITest
{
    void ITest.Test()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("base");
    }
    public void Test2()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("base2");
    }
    public void Test3()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("base3");
    }
}
public class Impl : Base, ITest
{
    void ITest.Test()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("impl");
    }
    void ITest.Test2()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("impl2");
    }
    public void Test3()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("impl3");
    }
}

And then use them like so:

        var i = new Impl();
        var b = (Base)i;
        var itest1 = (ITest)i;
        var itest2 = (ITest)b;
        itest1.Test();
        itest2.Test();
        itest1.Test2();
        itest2.Test2();
        i.Test2();
        b.Test2();
        i.Test3(); //for reference, a standard non-virtual method outside of an interface
        b.Test3();

I expected for the output to look something like so:

impl
base
impl2
base2
impl2
base2
impl3
base3

But of course, things can't be that simple. So, the actual output is this:

impl
impl
impl2
impl2
base2
base2
impl3
base3

Beyond this crazy weird behavior, is it possible to access the Base.Test() implementation?

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1  
Doing what it should as far as I can see. Casting is not converting. –  Tony Hopkinson Apr 30 '14 at 16:35
    
Precisely, casting is not converting. Besides, I'd suggest renaming the question slightly: How to call the base interface explicit implementation when derived classes explicit re-implement the interface? –  fernandoespinosa.org Apr 30 '14 at 16:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Maybe you should check why you find the results you get weird. To me it looks like you got exactly what you implemented.

There is no way to get Base.Test because there is no Base.Test. You need to access this through the interface explicitly and then it's no longer Base, but Impl, because the underlying real object is not of type Base.

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But if you add a Test3 method to both Base and Impl, but not to the interface, then you see the base3, impl3 behavior that I'm expecting –  Earlz Apr 30 '14 at 16:31
    
It seems like it treats interface implementations as always being virtual, but they are not marked virtual. I would expect this behavior if everything was virtualk –  Earlz Apr 30 '14 at 16:32
    
The key here is that you re-implemented the interface in Impl. So it will use its native implementation rather than the implementation inherited from Base. –  Nick Zimmerman Apr 30 '14 at 16:33
    
@NickZimmerman but how? It's cast to a Base, so why would it not use Base's implementation? –  Earlz Apr 30 '14 at 16:35
1  
Notice that when you don't cast to ITest, you get the Base implementation because it goes through the inheritance chain, taking the inherited version. –  Nick Zimmerman Apr 30 '14 at 16:45

Base is explicitly implementing ITest.Test(). It's an implementation, but it's a "private" implementation, only accessible through the ITest interface.

On top of that, Impl is re-implementing ITest.Test(), so when you try your itest2.Test() you are going to point to this later re-implementation.

The 2 key points here are:

  1. There is no public Base.Test().
  2. You killed all your possibilities of accessing the ITest.Test() implementation on Base by re-implementing it on Impl.

Re-implementation, re-implementation, re-implementation.

May I suggest renaming the question slightly: How to call the base interface explicit implementation when derived classes explicit re-implement the interface? Because that's what you are asking...

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