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Our nupkg packages contain multiple versions of the same dll (x86, x64, AnyCPU) and in the csproj files, in references I use conditional references to pick a specific dll depending on the current platform set. As a result I have multiple references to the same library (just different platform compilation).

here's a fragment of my csproj file:

<Reference Include="xxxx" Condition="'$(Platform)'=='x86'">            
   <HintPath>..\..\packages\xxxx.2.7.0.1093\lib\net45\x86\xxxx.dll</HintPath>
</Reference>
<Reference Include="xxxx" Condition="'$(Platform)'=='x64'">
  <HintPath>..\..\packages\xxxx.2.7.0.1093\lib\net45\x64\xxxx.dll</HintPath>
</Reference>
<Reference Include="xxxx" Condition="'$(Platform)'=='AnyCPU'">
  <HintPath>..\..\packages\xxxx.2.7.0.1093\lib\net45\AnyCPU\xxxx.dll</HintPath>
</Reference>

This construction works very well in both MSBuild and in Visual Studio.

Unfortunately after nuget update the csproj references get messed up. Here's the result:

<Reference Include="xxxx" Condition="'$(Platform)'=='x86'">
  <HintPath>..\..\packages\xxxx.2.7.0.1093\lib\net45\x86\xxxx.dll</HintPath>
</Reference>
<Reference Include="xxxx" Condition="'$(Platform)'=='x64'">
  <HintPath>..\..\packages\xxxx.2.7.0.1093\lib\net45\x64\xxxx.dll</HintPath>
</Reference>
<Reference Include="xxxx">
  <HintPath>..\..\packages\xxxx.2.7.0.1094\lib\net45\x86\xxxx.dll</HintPath>
</Reference>

So looks like only one reference got updated and... the Condition section got dropped as well as the first dll on the list was used.

Not what I was expecting. Any ideas how to best work around that problem? Anyone using conditional references in your csproj's with nuget? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
Nuget does voodoo to the .csproj references. The above is yet another reason I would like nuget packages at a SOLUTION level...and to be versionless. And let me control the versioning with the build-number ranges. I come from a java/ivy world.......which allows you to do handle binary-dependencies at a solution-level. I don't think you'll find a resolution, but hopefully I'm wrong and somebody will chime in. – granadaCoder Apr 30 '14 at 19:25
    
Thanks, I'm afraid you are right and the approach we are thinking of taking is to update the csproj files ourselves as part of the MSBuild "nuget-update" target. I was hoping someone would know a better way :/ Solution level dependencies make sense, especially in a situation when it's a bad idea to refer two different versions of the same DLL in one application. With project level dependencies it's quite easy to do. – Michal Rogozinski Apr 30 '14 at 20:05
    
I "get" that project-level dependencies situations could arise...but solution-level dependency management seems much more mainstream to me and project-level dependencies are more fringe cases. I'm not sure why nuget missed that boat.........but I'm not the sharpest knife in the drawer either. – granadaCoder Apr 30 '14 at 20:52
    
I'm in the same boat. Did you ever find a solution to this problem? – Mike Christensen Jul 7 '14 at 16:00
    
Unfortunately, we ended up just parsing and regex'ing the csproj file after nuget update and fixing what needed to be fixed. I wasn't able to find any better solution than that. – Michal Rogozinski Jul 8 '14 at 18:37

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