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I'm looking for a find all / delete all function for Window's registry. I couldn't find any utility that does that.

For example, if I want to delete all instance of a printer, I have to delete about ~20 keys/values using F3 and Del key in regedit.exe, which is time consuming.

So I would like to develop a little macro or batch file (so either VBA/batch) to do so. Which option is better? That would be a nice add-on to be able to also save the deleted keys in a .reg file.

According to an answer below, I could use reg query and reg delete.

I tried the following:

reg query HKLM /f *myPrinter* /s
reg query HKU /f *myPrinter* /s

Those 2 queries give me all the results I need to delete. Now, how could I backup this in a .reg key file and delete every results of the 2 queries?

Am I better doing this in VBA? I wouldn't mind doing a nice GUI with a list view for every query results. I guess it would also be easier to handle the loops and everything than it is in command line (assuming there is no direct way to do this with reg.exe).

share|improve this question

closed as too broad by Tim Williams, Ken White, Kevin Reid, sgress454, Ejay Apr 30 at 18:55

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
    
@TimWilliams I already did, and the second result on SU is still unanswered. –  dnLL Apr 30 at 18:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. Download Steve McMahon's cRegistry class.
  2. Import it into your project a class module named "Registry".
  3. Replace all instances of App.EXEName with CurrentProject.Name (The original was written for vb6. This will allow you to use it in vba.)
  4. Add the following functions to the end of the class.

The functions findSectionKey and getKeyValue actually implement the class and are good examples of how to use it.

Public Function findSectionKey(sectToFind As String, Optional sectToLookIn As String = "") As String
'*****************************************************************************
' Christopher Kuhn 4-16-14
'
' Returns:
'   Full section key as string
'       ex: "software\wow6432Node\ODBC\ODBCINST.INI\Oracle in OraClient11g_home1"
'   If a matching section key is not found, returns an empty string.
'   Only returns first matching section key.
'
' Params:
'       sectToFind - string representing the keynode you're searching for.
'           ex: "ODBCINST.INI"
'       sectToLookIn - String representing the keynode to start the search in.
'           If omitted, use parent reg object's sectionKey value.
'*****************************************************************************
On Error GoTo ErrHandler:
Const PROC_NAME As String = "findSectionKey"

    Dim sSect() As String   ' string array of subnodes
    Dim iSectCount As Long  ' length of sSect array
    Dim reg As Registry     ' use a clone reg so we don't damage current object

    ' Test for optional sectToLookIn param
    If sectToLookIn = "" Then
        sectToLookIn = Me.sectionKey
    End If
    ' create clone
    Set reg = New Registry
    With reg
        .ClassKey = Me.ClassKey
        .sectionKey = sectToLookIn
        ' create array of sections to search
        .EnumerateSections sSect, iSectCount
        ' search each section in array
        Dim i As Long
        For i = 1 To iSectCount
            'Debug.Print .sectionKey & "\" & sSect(i)
            If findSectionKey = "" Then
                If sSect(i) = sectToFind Then
                    ' found node
                    findSectionKey = .sectionKey & "\" & sSect(i)
                    Exit For
                Else
                    'search subnodes via recursion
                    findSectionKey = findSectionKey(sectToFind, .sectionKey & "\" & sSect(i))
                End If
            Else
                Exit For
            End If
        Next i
    End With

ExitFunction:
    If Not (reg Is Nothing) Then
        Set reg = Nothing
    End If
    Exit Function
ErrHandler:
    'errBox CLASS_NAME, PROC_NAME
    Resume ExitFunction
End Function

Public Function getKeyValue(valueKey As String, Optional sectToLookIn As String = "") As Variant
'*****************************************************************************
' Christopher Kuhn 4-16-14
'
' Returns:
'   Value as variant
'   If a matching value key is not found, returns an empty string.
'   Only returns first matching value key.
'
' Params:
'       valueKey - string representing the valueKey you're searching for.
'           ex: "ORACLE_HOME"
'       sectToLookIn - String representing the keynode to start the search in.
'           If omitted, use parent reg object's sectionKey value.
'           If parent reg does not have a sectionKey value, search everywhere.
'*****************************************************************************
On Error GoTo ErrHandler:
Const PROC_NAME As String = "findSectionKey"

    Dim reg As Registry
    Dim sKeys() As String
    Dim iKeyCt As Long
    Dim sSects() As String
    Dim iSectCt As Long
    Dim i As Long
    Dim j As Long

    ' test for optional parameter
    If sectToLookIn = "" And Me.sectionKey <> "" Then
        sectToLookIn = Me.sectionKey
    End If

    ' create reg clone so orginal is not damaged
    Set reg = New Registry
    With reg
        .ClassKey = Me.ClassKey
        If sectToLookIn <> "" Then
            .sectionKey = sectToLookIn
        End If
        ' for each value key in current section
        .EnumerateValues sKeys, iKeyCt
        For i = 1 To iKeyCt
            If sKeys(i) = valueKey Then
                ' found key
                .valueKey = sKeys(i)
                getKeyValue = .value
                Exit For
            End If
        Next i

        ' if key wasn't found, keep looking
        If IsEmpty(getKeyValue) Then
            ' for each section key in current section
            .EnumerateSections sSects, iSectCt
            For j = 1 To iSectCt
                If IsEmpty(getKeyValue) Then
                    ' recursive call
                    If .sectionKey = "" Then
                        ' no section specified
                        getKeyValue = getKeyValue(valueKey, sSects(j))
                    Else
                        ' all other cases
                        getKeyValue = getKeyValue(valueKey, .sectionKey & "\" & sSects(j))
                    End If
                Else
                    ' found key already
                    Exit For
                End If
            Next j
        End If
    End With
ExitFunction:
    If Not (reg Is Nothing) Then
        Set reg = Nothing
    End If
    Exit Function
ErrHandler:
    'errBox CLASS_NAME, PROC_NAME
    Resume ExitFunction
End Function

Delete is called like this.

Public Sub Delete()
    Dim reg As New Registry
    With reg
        .ClassKey = HKEY_CURRENT_USER
        'delete registry Section key
        .sectionKey = "Software\ODBC\odbc.ini\SomeDataSource"
        If Exists Then
            .DeleteKey
        End If
    End With
End Sub

*I would have posted my entire modification as is, but it exceeded the maximum number of characters allowed in an answer. Also, my extensions of Registry are not strictly necessary to delete a registry key. They might help you find instances of a specific key though.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your input. I'm actually looking at the other answer with reg query and reg delete as it is really easy to implement (doesn't actually need any real programmation) but if I'm still unable to do it with the command line, I will give a closer look to your solution. –  dnLL Apr 30 at 18:34
    
@dnLL I won't argue that batch or a .reg file isn't infinitely easier to implement. It is. I came up with this when I needed a pure vba solution to a similar issue. Good luck! –  RubberDuck Apr 30 at 18:39
    
Well if I want a GUI, VBA is probably the way to go and this looks like a solid solution. –  dnLL Apr 30 at 18:51
1  
I had to do some modifications and I'm kinda new with the implementation of classes in VBA but it seems to work quite nicely actually. For some reasons my question has been put on hold but I will accept your answer as is anyway. –  dnLL Apr 30 at 19:42
1  
Well obviously the modification you noted above (replaced APP.EXEName) but for some reasons, copy/pasting the code from here generated some line breaks when the lines were too long so I had to remove all of those too. Seems more like a formating bug of SO. Not much else so far except I didn't use the headers of the cls file provided by Steve McMahon since I'm using Access 2010 at the moment to generate the class file. This is kind of a long-term project since I will probably only be working on this half an hour per day but I will probably update this if there is anything else. –  dnLL Apr 30 at 20:59
reg query /?

and

reg delete /?

So you can search with query and build lists, then use delete to delete. See

for /?
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'm looking at it right now. –  dnLL Apr 30 at 18:20
    
The search query looks to be working but it looks like I have to loop through the results with the delete function, no possibility to just do something like reg delete HKLM /f *pattern* /s –  dnLL Apr 30 at 18:26
    
If it ever finishes searching the registry with two wildcards I'll look at the output. In the meantime you may find this directory interesting. c:\Windows\System32\Printing_Admin_Scripts\en-US –  tony bd Apr 30 at 19:56

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