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In C++, I'm trying to write a function with function pointers. I want to be able to throw an exception if a function pointer is passed for a function that does not exist. I tried to handle the function pointer like a normal pointer and check if it is null

#include <cstddef>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int add_1(const int& x) {
    return x + 1;
}

int foo(const int& x, int (*funcPtr)(const int& x)) {
    if (funcPtr != NULL) {
        return funcPtr(x);
    } else {
        throw "not a valid function pointer";
    }
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
try {
    int x = 5;

    cout << "add_1 result is " << add_1(x) << endl;

    cout << "foo add_1 result is " << foo(x, add_1) << endl;
    cout << "foo add_2 result is " << foo(x, add_2) << endl; //should produce an error
}
catch (const char* strException) {
    cerr << "Error: " << strException << endl;
}
catch (...) {
    cerr << "We caught an exception of an undetermined type" << endl;
}
    return 0;
}

but that doesn't seem to work. What is the best way to do this?

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Can you post the calling code? –  R Sahu Apr 30 '14 at 18:30
    
Did you at least test it by passing NULL or nullptr as the argument for the function pointer? –  Captain Obvlious Apr 30 '14 at 18:35
    
@RSahu I have added more code for how it might be used. –  John Apr 30 '14 at 18:37
    
@CaptainObvlious I'm more concerned about passing a function that doesn't exist than passing a null pointer. I was just trying to figure out how to go about doing that. –  John Apr 30 '14 at 18:38
1  
@John, the line with add_2 will result in a compiler error if it is not declared and a link time error if it is declared and not defined. –  R Sahu Apr 30 '14 at 18:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Checking for NULL is ok. But it is not possible to pass a pointer to a function that does not exist in the first place. So you don't have to worry about this. Although it is possible to just declare a function without defining it and pass the address of it. In that case you will get linker error.

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Why is it not possible to pass a pointer to a function that does not exist? –  juanchopanza Apr 30 '14 at 18:46
    
@juanchopanza: Well, you could use something like memcpy() to copy garbage into a function pointer object. Other than that, there's no way to construct a function pointer value (other than the null pointer) that doesn't point to an actual function. –  Keith Thompson Apr 30 '14 at 18:48
2  
@KeithThompson Couldn't you just pass an uninitialized function pointer? –  juanchopanza Apr 30 '14 at 18:55
    
@juanchopanza: Yes, good point. –  Keith Thompson Apr 30 '14 at 19:03
    
So, in conclusion, the second and third sentences of this answer are wrong. –  juanchopanza May 1 '14 at 6:59

It will automatically throw an error if you are passing pointer which does not exist, if you are declaring a pointer then you have to initialize it with null to avoid garbage value, so comparing with null will not serve any purpose.

you still you want to check then try to assign some function(like add, sub etc.), if it takes then ok , if not then it will show again error as previously mentioned.

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"It will automatically throw an error if you are passing pointer which does not exist" The standard does not say anything about "throwing an error". It is undefined behavior. Anything can happen. –  newacct May 1 '14 at 7:29
#include<cstddef>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int foo(const int& x, int (*funcPtr)(const int& x)) {
    if (*funcPtr != NULL) {
        return funcPtr(x);
    }
    else
    {
        cout << "not a valid function pointer";
    }
}

If you want to 'throw' exception then you need to 'catch' it as well. Your code is failing because of two reasons in short, 1) You are not checking value of function pointer. 2) You are not properly catching the thrown exception.

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