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I get this error when I compile my function.

PLS-00103: Encountered the symbol "*" when expecting one of the following: := . ( @ % ;

Here is the code:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION IncreaseSalary 

(para_empid IN employee.employeeid%TYPE, para_increase IN NUMBER)

 RETURN NUMBER 
IS

 v_SalaryOut NUMBER(10,2);
 v_salary2 NUMBER;

BEGIN

 SELECT Salary INTO v_Salary2
 FROM Employee
 WHERE employeeid = para_empid;

 --this is the area that pertains to the error
 (v_salary2 * para_increase) + v_salary2 = v_salaryout; 

 RETURN v_SalaryOut;

EXCEPTION
 WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND THEN DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Employee not found.');

END IncreaseSalary;
/

This next part wouldn't be part of the function and is not part of the error but probably has errors.

DECLARE
 v_SalaryOutput NUMBER := IncreaseSalary;

BEGIN
 IncreaseSalary('01885', '20%');

DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE ('Increased Salary: ')
 || TO_CHAR(v_SalaryOutput));

END;
/

The point is to take in two numbers (employeeid and the percentage to increase whatever salary is already listed in the table) and return the updated salary. I don't understand why I can't multiply.

share|improve this question
  1. You cannot assign value to variable like that. The target variable should come first. It should be,

    v_salaryout := (v_salary2 * para_increase) + v_salary2;

  2. You have declared para_increase as NUMBER. But while calling the function, you are passing '20%' as the value. This will result in numeric or value error: character to number conversion error.

  3. There is an extra bracket in you dbms_output statement.

    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE ('Increased Salary: ' || TO_CHAR(v_SalaryOutput));

share|improve this answer

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