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'map' preserves the number of elements, so using it on a Tuple seems sensible.

My attempts so far:

scala> (3,4).map(_*2)    
error: value map is not a member of (Int, Int)
       (3,4).map(_*2)
             ^
scala> (3,4).productIterator.map(_*2)
error: value * is not a member of Any
       (3,4).productIterator.map(_*2)
                                  ^
scala> (3,4).productIterator.map(_.asInstanceOf[Int]*2)
res4: Iterator[Int] = non-empty iterator

scala> (3,4).productIterator.map(_.asInstanceOf[Int]*2).toList
res5: List[Int] = List(6, 8)

It looks quite painful... And I haven't even begun to try to convert it back to a tuple.
Am I doing it wrong? Could the library be improved?

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It looks like you're using a tuple where you really ought to be using a collection. Consider using a real collection class instead - tuples should not be used as a kind of collections. –  Jesper Apr 30 '10 at 18:47
    
@Jesper: I disagree: I might simply want to apply the same operation DRY'ly and consicely on a collection of item whose size is statically known. –  Erik Allik Mar 8 at 5:16
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2 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

shapeless Supports mapping and folding over tuples via an intermediary HList representation,

Sample REPL session,

scala> import shapeless._ ; import Tuples._
import shapeless._
import Tuples._

scala> object double extends (Int -> Int) (_*2)
defined module double

scala> (3, 4).hlisted.map(double).tupled
res0: (Int, Int) = (6,8)

Where the elements of the tuple are of different types you can map with a polymorphic function with type-specific cases,

scala> object frob extends Poly1 {
     |   implicit def caseInt     = at[Int](_*2)
     |   implicit def caseString  = at[String]("!"+_+"!")
     |   implicit def caseBoolean = at[Boolean](!_)
     | }
defined module frob

scala> (23, "foo", false, "bar", 13).hlisted.map(frob).tupled
res1: (Int, String, Boolean, String, Int) = (46,!foo!,true,!bar!,26)

Update

As of shapeless 2.0.0-M1 mapping over tuples is supported directly. The above examples now look like this,

scala> import shapeless._, poly._, syntax.std.tuple._
import shapeless._
import poly._
import syntax.std.tuple._

scala> object double extends (Int -> Int) (_*2)
defined module double

scala> (3, 4) map double
res0: (Int, Int) = (6,8)

scala> object frob extends Poly1 {
     |   implicit def caseInt     = at[Int](_*2)
     |   implicit def caseString  = at[String]("!"+_+"!")
     |   implicit def caseBoolean = at[Boolean](!_)
     | }
defined module frob

scala> (23, "foo", false, "bar", 13) map frob
res1: (Int, String, Boolean, String, Int) = (46,!foo!,true,!bar!,26)
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This is great! I would mark your answer as accepted, but I don't know if it's ok to change the accepted answer after several years. –  Eldritch Conundrum Oct 25 '13 at 15:13
    
You should accept whichever answer you think is best. If the circumstances or your opinion changes over time, then I think it's reasonable to update your acceptance accordingly. –  Miles Sabin Oct 27 '13 at 12:21
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In general, the element types of a tuple aren't the same, so map doesn't make sense. You can define a function to handle the special case, though:

scala> def map[A, B](as: (A, A))(f: A => B) = 
     as match { case (a1, a2) => (f(a1), f(a2)) } 
map: [A,B](as: (A, A))(f: (A) => B)(B, B)

scala> val p = (1, 2)    
p: (Int, Int) = (1,2)

scala> map(p){ _ * 2 }
res1: (Int, Int) = (2,4)

You could use the Pimp My Library pattern to call this as p.map(_ * 2).

UPDATE

Even when the types of the elements are not the same, Tuple2[A, B] is a Bifunctor, which can be mapped with the bimap operation.

scala> import scalaz._
import scalaz._

scala> import Scalaz._
import Scalaz._

scala> val f = (_: Int) * 2
f: (Int) => Int = <function1>

scala> val g = (_: String) * 2
g: (String) => String = <function1>

scala> f <-: (1, "1") :-> g
res12: (Int, String) = (2,11)

UPDATE 2

http://gist.github.com/454818

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For the record, I'm changing the accepted answer from this to the more recent answer about the Shapeless library, which wasn't available back in 2010. –  Eldritch Conundrum Oct 28 '13 at 12:40
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