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I'm using a library that has a class with an init function distinct from its constructor. Every time I make a new instance I need to call, for example:

MyClass a;
a.init();

Since init is not const, this prevents me from creating const instances (I can't write const MyClass a). Is there some way to call init and then declare from "here on out" (I guess for the remainder of the scope) my variable is const?

This works, but relies on not touching the original variable:

MyClass dont_touch;
dont_touch.init();
const MyClass & a = dont_touch;
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The answer is no. Like you, I wish it was yes. –  Mehrdad Apr 30 at 23:56
    
You can also use const_cast for the init call to do it quick and dirty. That is, declare the object const, and const_cast around the object for the init call. However, const_cast is generally considered bad practice, and I've gotta say I think the templated solution is super slick. –  Apriori May 1 at 1:36
1  
@Apriori Definitely Undefined Behaviour. Can't const_cast away const from an a defined const object and do non-const stuff to it. –  Andre Kostur May 1 at 1:49
    
@Andre Kostur: Thank you, good call, I never realized or forgot this was undefined behavior. On the plus side you can see how much I use const_cast. C++ gave me the gun... –  Apriori May 1 at 2:36
1  
You can cast away const if you have a const reference to an underlying object which is non-const .. but that is not the case in this example –  Matt McNabb May 1 at 5:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

If you're using C++11 you could use a lambda function

const MyClass ConstantVal = []{ 
    MyClass a;
    a.init(); 
    return a; 
}();

This allows you to keep the initialization in place while never giving outside access to the mutable object. see also: http://herbsutter.com/2013/04/05/complex-initialization-for-a-const-variable/

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1  
I think this is more optimizable than my solution also, since the compiler can then assume that the object is never modified. –  Matt McNabb May 1 at 9:16
    
This answers my specific question. Though I could have asked a more general question where a.init() is replaced with some arbitrary operation that might not reasonably fit in the lambda. –  mangledorf May 2 at 16:18

You can create a wrapper class and use that instead.

If MyClass has a virtual destructor you can feel safe deriving from it like this:

class WrapperClass : public MyClass 
{
public:
    WrapperClass()
    {
        init(); // Let's hope this function doesn't throw
    }
};

Or write a class that contains the MyClass instance

class WrapperClass
{
public:
    WrapperClass()
    {
        m_myClass.init(); // Let's hope this function doesn't throw
    }
    operator MyClass&() {return m_myClass;}
    operator const MyClass&() const {return m_myClass;}
private:
    MyClass m_myClass;
};

Or write a template to solve this general problem using one of the two solutions above: eg.

template <class T> class WrapperClass : public T
{
public:
    WrapperClass()
    {
        T::init();
    }
};

typedef WrapperClass<MyClass> WrapperClass;
share|improve this answer
    
It's probably worth noting such a derived class can be defined within and local to the function it's used if desired. But using the template solution is even better and sidesteps this, because you can just instantiate at will. –  Apriori May 1 at 1:31
    
It's perfectly fine for init to throw. Let's hope it doesn't return an error code. The usual reason for init functions is that the developer knows an error can occur, but doesn't know exceptions, so he can't report the error if it happens in the ctor. –  MSalters May 1 at 9:40

Create a function that wraps the first two lines and gives you an object that is ready to go.

MyClass makeMyClass()
{
   MyClass a;
   a.init();
   return a;
}

// Now you can construct a const object or non-const object.
const MyClass a = makeMyClass();
MyClass b = makeMyClass(); 

Update

Using makeMyClass() involves construction and destruction of a temporary object everytime the function is called. If that becomes a significant cost, makeMyClass() can be altered to:

MyClass const& makeMyClass()
{
   static bool inited = false;
   static MyClass a;
   if ( !inited )
   {
     inited = true;
     a.init();
   }
   return a;
}

It's usage, as described earlier, will continue to work. In addition, once can also do this:

const MyClass& c = makeMyClass();
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This comes at the cost of a copy, correct? –  mangledorf Apr 30 at 23:44
1  
Yes, it does come at the cost of a copy. –  R Sahu Apr 30 at 23:45
2  
@mangledorf I'm not sure about this, but return value optimization might be useful. So if I understand it right, if you use -O3, I don't think you need to worry about this. Just a thought. –  gongzhitaao Apr 30 at 23:46
    
Even if RVO is present you need to make sure that your class's copy-constructor is correct. –  Matt McNabb May 1 at 5:31
    
const MyClass a = makeMyClass(); may be also const MyClass& a = makeMyClass();. –  Constructor May 1 at 6:17

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