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EDIT: The following code had a simple mistake which didn't actually illustrate the problem. I've left it here(uncorrected), but I'm still curious about answers to the questions at the bottom.

I have the following object in Python, that is supposed to always return true for an equality test:

class Wildcard(object):
    def __eq__(self, other):
        return True

It works in some cases, but not all:

>>> w = Wildcard()
>>> w == 'g'
True
>>> 'g' == w
True
>>> w == 10
True
>>> 10 == 'w'
False

From my understand, the == operator passes the second operand into the __ eq__ method of the first, which explains why w == 10 works but 10 == w does not. This raises two questions. First, is it possible to construct that object that has this property regardless of which operand it is? Second, why does this work on a string, but not an int? What about String's __ eq__ method makes it evaluate 'g' == w to True?

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1  
The last line is not comparing w and 10, but 'w' and 10 – thefourtheye May 1 '14 at 3:21
1  
@thefourtheye -- It's a reasonable observation (obviously an oversight on the part of OP), but it doesn't really address the question -- Can I make an object which equals everything regardless of whether it is the first or second argument? And the corollary, Why do some objects seem to delegate equality to the second argument and not others? I wish OP would clean up the question a bit and remove the errors, but I think it's a valid question at it's core. – mgilson May 1 '14 at 3:27
    
Why not just use True instead of comparing... I know this doesnt help but what's the point in returning True – user3570335 May 1 '14 at 3:33
1  
@user3570335 -- presumably because OP doesn't know what object (or type) is actually going to be used in the comparison -- This allows him/her to create an object which could take different code paths than normal (e.g. when mocking) – mgilson May 1 '14 at 3:48
    
@thefourtheye Wow, simple mistake on my part, thanks. I am still curious about answers to the questions. I updated the question to reflect the mistake. – user1547129 May 1 '14 at 5:55
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, there is no way (that I know of) to construct such an object. Consider:

>>> class Wildcard(object):
...     def __eq__(self, other):
...         return True
... 
>>> w = Wildcard()
>>> w == 10
True
>>> 10 == w
True
>>> class Joker(object):
...     def __eq__(self, other):
...         return False
... 
>>> j = Joker()
>>> w == j
True
>>> j == w
False

There is no reason for w (a Wildcard) to take precedence over j (a Joker) in this scenario.


Now, you might be wondering why this works for strings and ints -- It's because if the class's test returns the singleton NotImplemented, then the test is delegated from the first argument to the second:

>>> class Foo(object):
...     def __eq__(self, other):
...         if isinstance(other, Wildcard):
...             return NotImplemented
...         else:
...             return False
... 
>>> f = Foo()
>>> 
>>> f == 1
False
>>> f == Foo()
False
>>> f == w
True
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